The Real Estate Law Podcast

Producing Compelling and Effective Content with Personal Brand Building Pro Laura Stewart

October 18, 2022 Jason Muth + Rory Gill Season 1 Episode 72
The Real Estate Law Podcast
Producing Compelling and Effective Content with Personal Brand Building Pro Laura Stewart
Show Notes Transcript

Awesome episode all about marketing! We are talking about utilizing social media and building your personal brand online in this episode of The Real Estate Law Podcast.

Never before has it been more crucial to the success of a business to stand out and have an honest and favorable reputation when people search you on Google.

We have an enthusiastic and smart content creator in this episode - welcome Laura Stewart, Founder + CEO of FTGU Media, a full service marketing agency based out of Toronto.

FTGU Media (aka From The Ground Up Media) specializes in content creation and brand building for real estate agents, clothing brands, lifestyle influencers and more.

In this episode, we discussed:
- Where to start if you’re not a digital native or feel overwhelmed
- How to produce effective content for your real estate business
- Growing and managing a creative production team
- Why showcasing your authentic self if critical
- How Laura formed a partnership with Jas Takhar (Episode 70)
- What details need to be on your social media profiles
- Why humanizing your online persona is so critical
- How real estate professionals should show their authentic selves
- What are good and bad types of content for real estate professionals?
- Why only posting "just listing" and "just sold" content is a bad idea
- How to repurpose longer-form content into multiple shorter-form pieces
- Why giving without expecting anything in return led Laura to more business
- How to navigate multiple social channels.
- Using questions that you answer over email as ideas for video content
- Storytelling and how improving this will lead to better content

Where you can find Laura:
From the Ground Up Media - https://www.ftgumedia.com/
Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/laurastewartto/
TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@laurastewartto
Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/laurahistewart
YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCShHw4r4OZz7rUMiseQjZIA

Join Jason Muth and Attorney / Broker Rory Gill of NextHome Titletown and UrbanVillage Legal in Boston, Massachusetts for another episode of The Real Estate Law Podcast!

#realestatepodcast #nexthome #humansoverhouses #realestate #realestateinvesting #realestateinvestor #realestatelaw #realestatecontent #realestateagent #realestatemarketing #torontorealestate #brandbuilding #storytelling #contentcreation #authenticity
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The Real Estate Law Podcast is hosted by Jason Muth and Attorney / Broker Rory Gill.

This podcast and these show notes are not legal advice, but we hope you find both entertaining and informative.

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Laura Stewart:

I think learning how to deal with some of those insecurities that we had, we started to like build up these defense mechanisms. And these armors, which has worked out really well for us, except for when now, we're supposed to be on video showcasing our authentic selves. And we don't even know who our authentic self is anymore. We have to slowly start taking some of that armor off piece by piece to really get down to who we really are, and to really showcase ourselves from the camera and this doesn't.

Announcer:

You found The Real Estate Law Podcast, because real estate is more than just pretty pictures. And law goes well beyond the paperwork and courtroom argument. If you're a real estate professional, looking to build real estate expertise, then welcome to the conversation and discover more at realestatelawpodcast.com.

Jason Muth:

Welcome to The Real Estate Law Podcast. I'm Jason Muth. Thank you so much for listening to us. We have a really fun episode today. We're not talking about anything boring. Rory, we're not talking about law. I know it's in the title, but that's kind of a boring thing, right? You know, we're not talking about financing. We're talking about marketing. We're talking about social media, we're talking about energy and videos and lots of great stuff. We have an awesome content creator right here who specializes in social media and brand building and just kind of having an awesome presence online. This is Laura Stewart, who we're gonna introduce in a second and Laura Stewart is From The Ground Up Media. FTGU. What were you calling it? Foot goo? Fi-ti-gu! I knew I was gonna screw that up. So you have to tell us the origin of that name as well. Welcome Rory

Laura Stewart:

Fi-ti-gu! Fi-ti-gu! Gill, also our co host with UrbanVillage Legal at NextHome Titletown Real Estate in Boston.

Rory Gill:

Hey, Jason. So and for all of our listeners out there who are real estate agents, particularly if you're not driving, you might want to break out a note notepad and take a couple of notes here because we're gonna go through a lot of good ideas and tips and how you can put together good compelling content for your client base.

Jason Muth:

And you know, I should say with with Laura, Laura is actually it's almost a part two, kind of because you know, a couple episodes ago, we spoke with a dynamic guest Jas Takhar from Toronto and Laura, you guys are business partners in From The Ground Up Media. You also our Vice President in his real estate company, tell us about yourself, tell us about this relationship and how we're so lucky to have the two of you on our podcast.

Laura Stewart:

Well, my gosh, I already feel a disadvantage to be the follow up Jas. because he brings all the energy. And he's obviously inspired me in my life in many ways, and hopefully a lot of your listeners and viewers as well. I started with Jas eight years ago, I was a brand new real estate agent and I wanted to join a team. I thought, well, if I'm going to join a team, it may as well be one of the top teams in the country. And we happen to have a number of those teams here in Toronto, quite frankly, he was not my first choice. I've let him know this. But he's so damn good at sales that he sold me in the seat when I came to meet with him. And now we've been together like you said me as his VP of his team, which has 54 agents on it. I'm VP of that company. And then just about 16 months ago, we decided to be crazy and open up a media company. We're really helping real estate agents and small business owners create content so they can do more business really.

Jason Muth:

Laura, I think you have to change the story a little bit because I like to see Jas as the opening act. And you're the main event, right?

Laura Stewart:

Yes! So I'm like The Rolling Stones.

Jason Muth:

And he opened for the Stones. Stones through here. Did they just come through Toronto recently?

Laura Stewart:

Yeah, they're always they're always here. They actually are like, have a love affair with Toronto. So we get them a lot. It's great.

Jason Muth:

Yes, you're definitely the main event right here. So make sure you let him know that and I do want to point out your your Tiktok page, you have a really great bio of selling real estate running a media company and fashionably doing it all. Where'd that come from? So I think we're already starting off with a set of good

Laura Stewart:

I try to be fashionable some days better than others, to be honest with you. But yeah, I think when it comes to your profiles, a lot of people will put the more serious things that they are. And to me, that's real estate space, that is an opportunity for you to grab people's attention the best advice for real estate professionals out there and that way possible. And saying just real estate agent doesn't really say a lot about me. In Toronto, specifically, there's 77 76,000 real estate agents on the board. There's a lot of us and people are quite sick of us, I think in all honesty, so you need to find a way to distinguish yourself from the crowd. And so I like to always just give something that is a passion of mine, which is fashion. I don't know if you guys are gonna take me down my is to make sure that you have a good compelling profile. It career path. But I did work in that fashion industry for like two years. You know, you never let go of those old experiences. I love the creativity side of it. And I still use it in my day to day life because I get dressed every single day and I like putting together an outfit so I figured why don't I draw people in through my through my TikTok profile and let people know really who I am at the core. shows yourself in authentic ways. So kind of just breaking it down into, you know, spoon feeding the agents listening to this, what are some things that those agents can do to liven up their profiles? Like this is important real estate. So let's not put anything on there, that's not important. Obviously, you probably do want to let people know you are in real estate, maybe you want to include where you are a real estate agent, I actually don't have that. But that's because I'm trying to attract real estate agents on a more national level for our media services. But you specifically, if you work in the area, make sure that you say that because people start searching for real estate agents in a particular area. So make sure you put the neighborhood the city, whatever it is on there. And then I always think it's good to put just something fun, like maybe you're an avid avid churchgoer, maybe you're a dog lover, maybe you love skydiving, and you go six times a year, like something that really lets me know kind of who you are a little bit more without you just being a real estate agent.

Jason Muth:

Yeah, having that authenticity and you know, some element of your life that people can just grab on to that makes you more than a talking head and a screen and a zoom box, like we all are these days, you know, because of the pandemic, that's got to be critical. And you know, when you think about the small screens that everyone's looking at, you know, we're staring at vertical videos all day long on our phones, some people are just, you know, dying for attention. You know, I think people can see through the filter of who the authentic folks are, and who are the ones that are just kind of doing it for the camera. I don't know, what do you think, Laura? Like, what do you recommend to your clients? Or even friends of yours? Or just colleagues? Like, how do you recommend that they show their authentic self?

Laura Stewart:

Yeah, Jason, that's such a good point. Because I think it can be very hard for a lot of people. I mean, think about it, we've spent pretty much since high school onward, building up all of our armor, high school was a hard time for everybody, no matter like where you were on the pecking order. And I think, learning how to deal with some of those insecurities that we had, we started to like build up these defense mechanisms and these armors, which has worked out really well for us, except for when now we're supposed to be on video showcasing our authentic selves. And we don't even know who our authentic self is anymore. We have to slowly start taking some of that armor off piece by piece to really get down to who we really are. And to really showcase ourselves from the camera. And this doesn't happen overnight. This takes time. The first time I was told I was going to be on camera, we were going to have a gentleman named Scott McGilvery on the podcast, and he's a big HGTV guy, I was like, Oh my gosh, I have to look a certain way. So I went out, I got hair extensions, I got my eyelash extensions, like I got full lines, did my makeup, all of that just for a one hour shoot, and then it was kind of over. And here's the thing, no one video is going to make or break you no one video is going to really make you famous, it doesn't really work like that for the far majority of us. And so to put that kind of effort into A) how you look but B) a lot of people also try to come scripted things. They tried to write down all the answers and write down all the questions as opposed to just coming and being curious and learning from each other like what we're doing today. And so I think if you can slowly start to take off some of that armor and understand like, Hey, if you don't look that great that day, maybe you're a little shiny, you still get zits in your 30s, which I do. It's okay. You know what I mean? I am human. And the more that I started just accepting it and putting like, piece by piece out there, the better the feedback was, in all honesty, people started saying wow, like, you're so authentic, and you're showing your real self and I can really relate to you. It's when us as real estate agents, I think when we put on the suit, and we pretend to have it all together, and we want it all scripted and perfect and airbrushed and all that is when people can't really relate to us because no one looks like that. And no one really acts like that. And I always say guys, you're gonna be sitting down with these clients eventually anyway, so they're going to see what you look like. So if you airbrush yourself out, or if you come dressed to the nines, and then you never actually dress like that in real life, people are going to see you and now they're gonna think you're a liar. And to be honest, most people think real estate agents are liars anyway. So you're not doing yourself any good by continuing to lie to these people. So I just say, slowly, but surely, work at getting yourself out there work at being more confident. It comes in time. You'll see in a year from now, when you've done, say 105 posts that you're so much better off now than you were when you started but it doesn't feel like it when you're on the journey in all honesty, but you just got to stick with it.

Rory Gill:

When I start working with my agents on video content, almost invariably, they start off thinking that what they're filming is going to be a major 30-second spot in the Super Bowl that has to be perfectly scripted, perfectly produced, and that's what their clients expect. But those pieces even if you were able to get that level of perfection, those are not the ones that are building the connection with their clients. And that's really the purpose of this. You know, most of us are fairly small businesses, we're not putting this video out to be seen by 10s of 1000s of people, we're trying to make one on one connections with people. And people know that people aren't perfect. And having that authenticity helps, and I don't have the metrics to back it up, but that's what I encourage all my agents to do - to be imperfect and authentic when they talk to people. So I'm really happy to be hearing that from you.

Laura Stewart:

Oh, yeah, the more authentic that you are, the more you're willing, willing to showcase some of your flaws, or put yourself out there, or some of the struggles you've had in life, people really start to support you more. People always want to be part of a come up story. So if you come your content, like you want it to be perfect, right from the get go, then people don't think they need to help you. It's like the real estate agents who drive around in their fancy Mercedes and their BMWs your friends are gonna say, Oh, well, I guess you're doing well. I'm gonna give my business to my neighbor who just got started, right? But really, you can't even afford the car that you're driving anyways. And you actually need that business. And so there's something about saying, I'm human, I'm just like, you guys, here's where I struggle in life. Like me being on camera, that was a massive struggle, and I struggle to this day, but I'm working on it. Or Jas, who I'm sure talks at some point about his sweaty hands, like he used to always be nervous about his sweaty hands. And there's something that really draws you and he likes to wear T-shirts to work. And that's how he feels comfortable. I like to get dressed up. That's how I feel comfortable. But as long as I know, I'm doing it for myself, and not for my viewers, I find that's what's really, really helped me build a very specific audience. That doesn't mean I'm going to have everyone fall in love with me. People might look at me and say, Well, I don't really like that she speaks like that, or she looks like that. And I don't like that she talked about not being perfect, because I'm a perfectionist. OK. I'm probably not going to get your business anyway. So that's okay, let's kind of move on. And it allows you to pre-sort. So a lot of agents spend a lot of time on phones, and in meetings, trying to fake it and figure it out along with people and see if they're driving, when in reality, if they had just seen you kind of on your social media channels, they would have known not to reach out to you because you're a dog lover, and they absolutely can't stand dogs so great, we wouldn't have wasted each other's time. I do think it's important Rory for me to point out that most people when they say I'm a perfectionist, is really just them being scared. And I know, I used to be one. So that's why I can actually say this, because I used to consider myself a perfectionist. I wanted everything to look a certain way, but a certain way according to my standards. And I think that's where people need to understand like, my standards are different than other people's and what I think is good content isn't necessarily what someone else does. And so try to not grade your own work first and foremost. And also understand that if you're using the word perfectionist, try to break that down a little bit. Like, why? What people will usually start to say to me is, well, you know, I want it to look good. And then I'll say look good, according to who? Well, when I put it on social media, I want people to say they like it. Okay, so you care about the judgments of other people on social media? And then they'll say, Yeah, I guess so. And I'd say okay, so you're fearful that they might not like it be judging you. And that's kind of what makes them go, Aha, yeah, I guess she's right. It is just, it is just me being fearful. So I always, always try to stop people, when they say I'm a perfectionist and say, hold on, let's work on this for a second. Because if you don't recognize it, you're definitely not going to be able to change it.

Jason Muth:

You know, I really believe that Done is better than Perfect. Right? So just get it out there, get something going, show your flaws. You know, we did not put on our eyelash extensions for this interview, thankfully, because you would have called us on that. You know, you mentioned something in your social media that I was watching earlier this week, where if people are going to be judging you, you know, they're gonna be judging everybody, right? They're gonna judge every post that's out there. So they're just gonna scroll past you, and then judge the next one and the next one. So they're just judging people. So just move on from that, like, get yourself out there. I think people appreciate the effort. You know, none of our stuff is perfect. We've been doing this podcast, you know this for quite some time. Now. We're, you know, approaching 80 episodes at this point.

Laura Stewart:

Wow!

Jason Muth:

We - yeah, thank you. We stuck with it. You know, not everyone does, but

Laura Stewart:

Most people don't get past 10 episodes, so.

Jason Muth:

Yeah, we're eight times as good Rory!

Laura Stewart:

There you go.

Jason Muth:

But, you know, we're just putting stuff out there. I think people appreciate the effort and they appreciate the fact that we took some time to write the show notes and put the right links in there and put some snippets out on social media and you know, if we're doing too much then so be it, like we're trying, right? Everyone is trying and I think people appreciate the effort and we've run into some folks are like, oh, yeah, I've seen your podcast stuff, you know, they're not saying they love it or they hate it. They're just saying that to see it. And sometimes it's all you want, you want attention, right? You want to capture you know, a couple fleeting moments from somebody as you're looking to build up a business or build up a brand just like you guys are doing, you know, not just with From The Ground Up Media, but you know, Jas himself. You know, he had a funny thing that he said he's like, you know, boy, if you can't find me on online if you Google me and you can't find me I'm doing something wrong. And I'm like, Well, good thing. I googled you. And I found you very easily.

Laura Stewart:

Yes, he's very Googleable. I wish I had a more unique name, perhaps than Laura Stewart and I might be more Googleable as well. But no, he puts so much effort behind personal brand. And I've helped him kind of behind the scenes, I helped him start the podcast, essentially, I took a university class when I was doing my MBA called Me, Inc. And in that class, this was in 2012. So personal brands wasn't really in spotlight like it is today. But it was talking about the importance of building yourself as your own brand and marketing yourself no matter where you go in life, you can always take your brand with you. And so when Jas wanted to start this podcast, I mean, that really resonated with me. At first, we really just wanted to provide educational content to our viewers. And like you said, we therefore didn't need to be show host by any stretch of the imagination. Our database understood that we were real estate agents, not professional video host people. And so that was very, very easy for us. But then something funny happened. Eventually it got traction, and it started to snowball, we started to attract real estate agents and other professionals, mortgage brokers and small business owners and things like that. And that kind of is what it morphed into today, which is a new brand new company. And so what people want always is the brand new company kind of idea first, like I want the amazing show, and I want chairs, and the best lighting and the best, everything the best video cameras, but then they never get started. Because they wait until they can afford to buy the equipment, they wait until they can get the administrative person or the videographer to help. And nothing ever happens. And then they end up not pursuing any of their dreams. And so when we first started the podcast, it was me behind the computer, like trying to figure out the audio. And trust me like you guys don't know me like that. But I should not be doing that job, that's for sure. And we just kind of figured it out like Google, great. I Googled how to do a lot of things YouTube awesome, showed me how to do something. And once we got to that critical scale, maybe where you guys are at now where you've done 80 episodes, it's like okay, maybe we can outsource. Maybe you've already done that. But you should always start with the idea of doing it yourself first, even if it sucks. Nobody's watching you at the start anyway, so be a little bit humble. You're not Kim Kardashian, where you just like start TikTok and have 50 million followers like that, like you literally have your parents and your friends who are following you. So have a bit of humility. They don't care what you look like or what you sound like, because they already know what you look like and sound like and they want to be part of your come up journey. They want to be your biggest fan. Like people are so fascinating to me, because they'll say, Oh, I was listening to Jas Takhar three years ago. And they feel like they found him first. Like before he was anybody you know what I mean? Or like, I'd started listening to Gary Vee in 2017. And you're only getting into him now, like everyone wants to be the first person along. So content allows you to let people kind of be part of that journey with you. But you can only do that if you actually get started. And so screw it, take your phone, hold it up like this. Do a recording, put it out there cringe, you're going to you're gonna be like, Oh my god, I can't believe it. But I always say is post the darn thing. And then close your phone and don't go back into say Instagram for like two days, like don't even bother going back. You don't need to know what people are saying. Because you're scared that people are gonna be ripping you apart. But they're not. And you're gonna go back and you're like, Okay, I wasn't so bad. And then do another one. And you kind of build on it like that.

Rory Gill:

Knowing that perfection is not the goal. Here's kind of the wide open question. What are somw - what are some good content for real estate professionals? And what some bad content for real estate professionals that's been put

Laura Stewart:

I think bad content to me would be out there? exclusively posting just listed just sold. Because that content really is about you the agent. It has no value to the viewer. So you're really just bragging saying like, I got a listing. Oh my gosh, now in eight days, I sold it. And then everyone's like, great, so you made X amount of dollars. That's all they're seeing Right? Like ching, ching ching, real estate's the easiest industry ever. That's all you're showcasing to people. But if you start showcasing some tips, some educational content without asking for anything, here's the second thing that people do that I think, in my opinion is not great is that they'll give the educational tip. But then at the end of that tip they'll follow up with a "if you're thinking about buying or selling, give me a call. If you need more information, give me a call. You need something message me." They're always asking for something at the end. And that's what people expect you to do as a real estate agent. Because whenever you've done any of your calls to your database, or whenever you've sent out an email with market stats, chances are at the end, you write something like if you need help buying or selling I'm here for you something along those lines, so they expect you to do it. So how about you do the unexpected and just not ask for anything back? How about you just give and then hopefully you'll receive in the future because you did something that was good for people and you provided value. So I think that just listen, just sold - sprinkle those in. But that really should be few and far between. Ideally, if you want to make your life easy, I would do something like a webinar, a 30 minute webinar with a real estate service provider, a lawyer, a mortgage broker, insurance person, home inspector, an accountant, stager. Bring those people on so that you don't need to be the expert. Instead, you sit there and have a conversation where you're asking them specific questions about what they do. And they'll be able to talk about it very easily, because it's what they do every single day. You record that, and you send that to your database without asking for anything to me is a great place to start because now you have a 30 minute macro piece of content. And you can cut that up into little segments. So maybe there's a little clip, where the mortgage broker said something about interest rates and how that's going to impact their buying ability, and you take out a minute, and you post that on all the social media platforms, you know that one recording for 30 minutes actually ended up now providing you with maybe a couple of days worth of content, where you don't need to think about producing your own content, like a tip video or something like that.

Jason Muth:

Yeah, Jas spoke about that also, so I'm not sure if he took it from you, or or you took it from him probably the opposite, or you're both just in sync, because you know, you're doing this together?

Laura Stewart:

Well thank goodness, we're in sync, we're business partner. So if he was saying something very different, we would have a problem I think.

Jason Muth:

No he said the same thing is like, you know, take one piece of content, and you could just repurpose it, you know, 20 different ways. You guys are obviously thinking about the bigger picture when you're going to record something. Tell us about how From The Ground Up Media kind of came together? Because were you guys doing videos just without the brand. And then you said, hey, this is something we can get a business around and maybe get some more folks, you know, as clients like to talk about that.

Laura Stewart:

Yeah it's so funny. I never ever pictured myself really, as a business owner, in all honesty, but certainly not a media business owner Never did I picture that. What happened was with the podcast, it started spiraling and we started getting a lot of attention from the real estate agent community started with our office. We're the top producer at our office. So people are always looking to, you know, the people who are kind of at the top and seeing what we're doing, maybe they should adopt those things. So it started with the office, then it kind of grew outward. And now it's Toronto bound, like a lot of real estate agents, know of us because of the content. And they would ask to have meetings with us. And we would take them gladly sit there for an hour, hour and a half at times really give them all the information. Why would we do that? I don't know. There was no intent behind it at the start, I think Jas and I just had the mindset that there's more than enough business to go around. And so I didn't feel that by giving away some information to another real estate agent that that meant I was going to have less business. In fact, the weirdest thing happened, it did the opposite, we suddenly got busier, we had more business than we'd ever have. And so we just gave without any expectation, like I talk about on on the content, like giving without expecting something in return, we did that with the agents, we would give them the playbook. This is how you need to start. This is who you could hire if you're at that place where you need to hire people. And then we would check in on them three months later, three, four months later, and ask how the content was going. Some of them I noticed like you didn't really post anything on Instagram, what's going on? And they would say I didn't know where to start. I said, But I told you where to start. Yeah, but I don't know who to hire, or Yeah, but I don't have the equipment and all these excuses whether they're good or bad. I mean, at the end of the day, they're excuses because they can be overcome. And, you know, sometimes you would ask as well, can't I just borrow your crew, you already have people who you've hired and vetted. And you hear that enough times and the little light bulb goes off. And you think, well, maybe there's a business here. And that's what I think is so neat about the real estate industry because it is made up of entrepreneurial type people. Some, at least. And we just thought, let's give it a try. And we did what you had just talked about before we just got started. We we threw it out there to a couple of agents ask some people if they thought that they might need this type of service. And it's been going on for 16 months has been probably the most difficult and most fun 16 months of my life. Because I've now pushed myself outside my comfort zone. I've never led before I've never really had a bunch of people working under me looking to me for leadership. And so that's been that's been a big growth on my part. Jas less so but now we're business partners before he used to kind of be able to boss me around a little bit more than he can now so that's that's been a lot of fun. But yeah, I think just noticing something in the marketplace when people start to say things again and again. You know, people always want to come up with like the next big idea like what's the my business idea going to be that's going to be huge and I'm going to be a millionaire. And sometimes a dancers are just right in front of you. Not that this is a billion dollar idea, by any stretch of the imagination. There's many media companies. But I think what makes us kind of different is that we're real estate agents helping other real estate agents. And I feel like we're leveling up, at least in Toronto, the real estate industry, kind of one by like, person by person. And that's been a lot of fun.

Jason Muth:

So Laura, can you talk a little bit about some differences that you're seeing 16 months into this journey with the media company that, you know, were not in existence a year ago, or how the space has even evolved this quickly. Because, you know, as we know, digital media changes all the time, whether it's an algorithm change, or whether it's privacy issue that comes up, or whether it's a new platform that comes out or a tweak to the way that something is presented. What are you doing differently today, for yourself and for your clients, as opposed to like just a year ago?

Laura Stewart:

We're always trying to stay on top of it, it can be very difficult. I think what makes us kind of unique is that we don't really follow the platforms exclusively. So when we first started, Instagram was where it's at. And now a lot of people, particularly real estate agents have finally caught on to the idea of doing content. So they're doing that on Instagram, for example. But now TikTok's really taken over since the pandemic started. And now there's shifting attention over there. And so people have an amazing opportunity to make it in TikTok. And if you were kind of late to Instagram, and you said, I'm never gonna get traction here, I mean, well, here's an amazing opportunity for you to kind of win that traction before the majority of real estate agents move over there. But where I think we're different is that we don't leave Instagram to go to TikTok, we didn't leave Facebook to go to Instagram. We don't not send emails to our database, because the open rate has dropped 40%. We do all of it. So we're on YouTube, we're on TikTok, we're on LinkedIn. And although it becomes more and more and more and more, the thing is, it's very important, because right now, Facebook fan pages, you're getting a lot of traction there. So Facebook was so saturated with ads and things like that, before that content creators really couldn't, couldn't get a lot of eyeballs. So people stopped posting there. But now I'm still posing there. And suddenly those posts are getting a lot more views and a lot more engagement. And so I think the idea is to somehow figure out how you can really be omnipresent across as many channels as you possibly can, which isn't easy. I'm not saying that's an easy task. I think it's really important instead of focusing on any one area, unless of course, your like goal in life is like, I just want to be an influencer. And I want to like win on TikTok. And so that's the only one I'm going to focus on. And you go deep that way. But again, I'm speaking to real estate agents or real estate professionals, where that's not really your goal here. So let's make sure that we're hitting people across all channels, and also know that the mindset of people on those channels is different. So when you get to work Monday morning, and you log into LinkedIn, your mindset is very different than it was the night before when you were scrolling your phone in bed looking at TikTok. And so you need to try if you can to produce content that's specific to each platform. At the start, though, guys, if you're listening, you're like, that sounds super overwhelming, just do the webinar 30 minutes and chop that up and post those pieces everywhere. Don't make it hard on yourself, make sure you you figure that hack out first, and then you kind of expand and grow on it.

Jason Muth:

Rory, I thought you had some right there. So I'll just do because I have to follow up question to that actually. You know, TikTok has certainly taken over in the past couple of years, and I can see how people can get overwhelmed by you know, yet another platform, right? It just, you know, it's one after another after another? Where do you start if you are some of that's not a digital native? I know, you mentioned that you had what was the class in college and your MBA program or your

Laura Stewart:

Oh, it was a Me, Inc. was called? Right? Okay.

Jason Muth:

So imagine somebody I went to college in the 90s, right? You know, Rory went to college in the 2000s. Like, forget about personal branding, like the internet barely existed, like when I was there. So like, you know, we have to force ourselves, I had to force myself to learn this stuff. You know, Rory's a little more native, and you're definitely a digital native. You know, if you're working with an agent who has an established career, or maybe a second career, and they're later in life in their 40s-50s, whatever, and this doesn't come natural to them. Where do you think they should start?

Laura Stewart:

I have to tell you, it doesn't come. I wouldn't say natural to me, either. But I understand that, you know, if you weren't born with a phone in your hand, which I wasn't, but, you know, maybe my late teens, we got like MSN and that was kind of a cool thing. But yeah, if that was if that happened when you were already well into your 30s. You know, I understand the difficulty here and how fast everything is moving. I think it's important to know what your goals are. So just because I'm sitting here telling preaching do content more is more and more is more. That doesn't mean that's right for you where you are in your life. I'm talking exclusively to people who want to continue to build, they want to grow. If you're an established agent and you like working your database, and you're kind of good with that. And you only see yourself doing this, say for five more years, that's probably going to be good enough. But if you say, oh, I'm planning on doing this for another 15 years, then I would caution you that if you're not speaking to your community online, on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, I am. And so you have to understand the risks involved in doing that. To get started, if you know YouTubing how to how to open a TikTok account is also too difficult for you. Maybe you have a niece, or a nephew, or you already have an admin person who's younger, who is able to help kind of fill in those gaps for you and help support you in that way. But I don't think this is like a one size fits all for everybody. I think having some presence online is better than none. And I think having a lot is better than some, and you kind of have to find out on the continuum, where you're at, and then seek help wherever you can. Like, I can't edit a video to save my life. So even if I was brand new, it's like, it really doesn't matter. I could Google how to do it. But it would still take too long, I would get frustrated and upset before I know it, I've spent an entire day coming up with one piece of content, that's not really a good use of my time. So at some point, you have to part ways with a little bit of money, perhaps, and outsource it. And if you're an established agent, then you should have a couple extra dollars in your pocket anyway.

Rory Gill:

When I work with some of the agents who are, you know, generationally not digital natives, the first thing I want to do before we jump into the technical is just make them realize that a lot of what people are doing online is things that they're doing already. So it's not an entirely different world, the questions that they answer repeatedly for clients the way that they talk to people, but they're already doing this, they already have that expertise. And it's just a matter of now of putting a phone in front of their face and setting it up on some social platform. And I like what you said there, you can kind of start off with a couple platforms that are a little bit more intuitive, they might know a little bit better. They don't necessarily have to, on day one, embrace five different platforms and have everything up on there. But they can just start by at least realizing before we get into any of the technical aspects of it, that they're already doing a lot of this work anyway. And we can just repurpose what they're doing and just deliver it on these channels.

Laura Stewart:

Yeah, there's no need to overwhelm yourselves. Like, let's just pick one channel. And let's try to get out one post. That's all I say. I was like, it starts with one post and don't think about your 60th post. Let's get one post done, and see how it goes, right? And I think a great place to start because people ask me often well, where do you get all the content ideas? And as you said, you already know the content, you're having these conversations with people anyway. So perhaps you got an email last night, I'll say, bring up your email, and they'll bring it up. And they'll say, Well, I have a client who asked me about closing costs on the home that they that they're in conditional period for a great and how did you answer it? And then they show me the email - like that's, that's your tip that you're going to do today? These are the closing costs that you need to know if you're buying a home in XYZ, state or province. It's all right there. If you're on a listing appointment, someone asks you a question about how you came to, to the listing price. That's the that you're going to do a video on that. And so you just have to be mindful that your eyes just have to be open, your ears have to be open about what's going around you and answer those questions. You don't need to overthink this. This isn't rocket science, like we are all real estate. We know how we got here. We know how our lack of schooling we did to get here. So let's not overthink it. Let's just get get a couple posts done.

Jason Muth:

Yeah, there's a lot of behind the scenes stuff that I think is easy, but hard for people to do. You just gave an amazing tip right there. Like if somebody answered a question in an email, and they probably answered it. Well, you said create a piece of content about that, like, you know, we don't do enough of that stuff. I think most people don't do enough enough of that stuff. All the blog content, you know, that we're writing to other people are writing those can easily be short snippets of video as well you can answer these questions right on camera, give the three four bullet points that you have in a written format. I just think back to past jobs, like you know, my past life was working in the media in various capacities, on-air consulting, sales management, and I think about all the things that I did day to day, and I never captured that on video for an audience of people because that kind of wasn't a thing. And I was like, Well, who the heck wants to like see what a sales manager does all day long. But maybe there's people out there that want to do that. I could have very well done that saying like, Hey, I'm about to go meet with these account executives and go over their prospect list right here. And you know, think about a couple ideas, comparing their numbers to last year as to how they can grow their book of business. Like you know, here's what I look at, you know, boom, boom, boom, point, point, point, and then things pop up on the screen back could have been like my video. You could do this in any job in the world, right?

Laura Stewart:

It's so funny. You said people might not want to view it like you didn't think they'd think it was interesting, but like no one thought that anyone would ever want to see a picture of the food I ate for dinner and yet every anytime I go to a restaurant, I take a picture of the food I ate for dinner. People are interested. And particularly if people are looking for your service at that given time, they're extremely interested. So I say, try to think about how you can educate people, particularly in the time that they're looking to buy or sell or whatever it is that your business is. And then in the meantime, or the interim, how else are you entertaining them, to try to showcase a little bit of yourself, don't just put in the profile that you like dogs, show me your dog. That's how you're going to really humanize yourself. And then so that content really should come easily, because you're really just documenting your life, you're not creating anything, you're just documenting what you're doing with your kids on the weekend, or you're showcasing that you ran a marathon. And all those things should come a little bit more naturally, what you'll find is by practicing that stuff, that feels maybe a little bit more authentic, or you don't feel like you have impostor syndrome, because you might not be educated or experienced enough to talk about it, showcase that stuff versus get you used to being in front of the camera, and then kind of work your way into into your industry. And also know in terms of imposter syndrome. Guys, you don't have to go online and lie and say you've been doing something for 10 years. You can say I'm a brand new agent, and I was sitting in a meeting today, my mentor, and he answered the question about XYZ. So you can bring in these stories where people understand that you're not necessarily the expert, but they really like being again along the ride along the journey with you. So again, you don't have to lie, you don't have to say that you know, things that you don't, I think another opportunity for you with the content is to say, I got an email from a client yesterday. And she asked yada, yada, yada. The key there is that I told people, I was in real estate without actually bragging about my client. So instead of me doing the just listed or just sold, I'm telling you, I'm active in real estate, I'm telling you, I'm actively working with people, without me outright bragging about it, you're just including it in storytelling. And if you can get good at storytelling, then content is going to be very, very easy for you.

Jason Muth:

Yeah, I want to underline that point. I mean, like everything is storytelling, it's being honest, too. But selling is storytelling. You know, another thing to think about is every industry that you're in, if you're listening this podcast, and you and you're teacher, right, or you're an accountant, or your real estate, or you're an astronaut, whatever it is, you're probably following lots of accounts and people that are in your industry. So it might seem overwhelming that everything you see is just that industry, I mean, the real estate world, the law world, a lot of what we see on social media is you know, stuff that's in the market already. So you might get overwhelmed and say, Well, geez, people are already doing this. Or I already saw a story about this. But keep in mind that a lot of your customers are not following only education accounts, only real estate accounts, only astronaut accounts, right? You are one of the many, many, many types of accounts are following. So you might be their expert on their feed for that subject. Whereas on your feed, everybody's talking about the same thing. So it's important to remember that kind of context, because sometimes I even get stuck, where I just feel like I've seen the same thing everywhere. And that means that everybody's already doing it. But it's really - here, I'll give you an example, okay? We're doing more with short term rentals right now. Okay, we have a couple of short term rentals, we're going to scale this thing up. I see a ton of content about this now because that's what I'm engaging with. And I feel like all I see is short term rental content. But I went to a meet up last week, the speaker was all about short term rentals, there's a room of 40-something people, all real estate investors, he said, How many people here have short term rentals, 10% of the people raised their hand, okay. 90% did not. That means that they're not overwhelmed with that same content that I'm overwhelmed with. Because all I do is I see that kind of content. So think about that, if you're listening to this, and you don't want to take that step about producing content, it's not like you're just going to be the 500 millionth person doing the same thing. Like you're gonna do it in your own way. And you're gonna put your

Laura Stewart:

That's just it, Jason, like, you have to do it in your own way. Where I made my mistake in the start was I tried to do my content like Jas. And I tried to bring the same type of energy or explain things the same way that he does. And now like, yeah, we might be on similar pages with some things, but I'm saying it differently. And also, you know, people need to hear things like three, four, or five times before they ever actually do anything. So it's okay that other people are educating. You're going to educate your way, you're going to entertain people online your way, and some will like you, and some won't. And that's you got to just let that go. You can't worry about what other people are doing.

Jason Muth:

Pretty good about three, four or five. I was told by an old sales manager, it's 10 times like when I used to work as salespeople and I would try to roll new projects and new products out and you'd roll something out. You roll a process out and then like you follow up a couple weeks later, and no one's done anything with it. You're like, well, I just told you last week, like what's the deal because you have to tell salespeople something 10 times for them to hear it. I'm like, you know what, you're right. It's like selling to people like you know, you send that 10th email, and you probably get the appointment because people stopped at nine or they stopped at one.

Laura Stewart:

Yeah, You can't stop in this business. I mean, and most real estate agent should know that because how many follow up phone calls have they made? How many flyers have they sent out to a farming neighborhood? You're right, the people who quit are like probably just 2-3-4 more touches away from actually getting something out of it. And so having patience is probably the most important thing, the biggest key in all of this.

Jason Muth:

So much great advice here. I mean, like, I just hear sound bites left and right from this podcast. So I really appreciate everything that you've like, brought to us, you know, Laura, it's just amazing. We could probably go on forever about, you know, authenticity and social media presence and just coming up with great ideas to formulate, you know, a just good reputable, reputation online.

Laura Stewart:

So does that mean you're gonna slice and dice this up and make clips for social media? See? Oh, yes, yes. Yeah, it's not that hard guys.

Jason Muth:

I do snippets. We do, quote cards, we transcribe the whole thing. We do blog posts about it, like, yeah, there's a whole cadence. And we learned that from talking to people like yourself, and listening to some other great practices with podcasts, where you realize that you're not just putting out one piece of content, you're producing one piece of content and making, you know, 20 things out of it. I think, Jas last week when we were recording, I think he was recording too. So part of me feels like we're on your account.

Laura Stewart:

We are being recorded. And I have my own little mic here. So we do the same thing for me. And you know, it's it's interesting, guys, like, I really appreciate you having me on because some might think, Well, you had my business partner on what possibly could we talk that's different. But you'd be surprised. First and foremost, Jas has a very different upbringing than I do. His education is very different than mine is. And his experience with real estate is very different than mine is, as well, on the real estate side, he's the owner. And he has been doing it for 17 years. On the real estate side, I'm the VP. And I've only been doing it for eight years. So where we're at in our business journey is very, very different. And I think it's so important to try to get on other people's podcasts like doing this, like you guys should reach out to other people and try and get on their podcast as well. Because this allows you to formulate your sentences and get your ideas prepared for when you want to actually go on camera. It's actually really, really good practice to have someone just ask you questions, you answer them online, because then you don't feel like you have to be scripted, right? It's just a conversation. That's all we did today. And so that's another opportunity. I'll just throw one more tidbit in there another opportunity for people if you don't want to start your own podcast or webinar show, maybe reach out to some other industry professionals and try to get on their show. They work in your area. That can be a great way to really open up your network

Jason Muth:

Did Jas tell you that we're starting a podcast together? Tequila in Toronto. He didn't tell you, did he?

Laura Stewart:

Oh, God, not tequila. Do I get to be part of the podcast?

Jason Muth:

Absolutely. He invited us. Yes, he talked about tequila. So we should do a podcast Tequila in Toronto. So when we come visit, we'll we'll have the first episode.

Laura Stewart:

That's amazing. Love that.

Jason Muth:

Well, Rory, why don't do you have any final thoughts? Before we get to the follow up questions for Laura?

Rory Gill:

I took a note here and is breaking the topic a little bit. But you said that when you started off in real estate, you wanted to join a team instead of working by yourself? Why was that? I can kind of see you the journey that led you on. But why did you want to be on a team to start with?

Laura Stewart:

Yeah, I guess that was just a little bit of self awareness. like growing up, I always like to surround myself with a lot of people. I had just come off of doing my MBA where everything really was teamwork, and collaboration. And the idea of kind of being a solo agent, I just knew myself like I wasn't going to be inspired enough to get out of bed every morning and whip myself into shape and make the phone calls and send the emails and do everything that I needed to do. So my theory at the time was that if I joined a team, they would probably help cut my learning time in half. I knew I would be dealing with people's largest asset. And that scared the crap out of me, in all honesty, like the idea that someone would put their house in my hands, and I would have to sell it for top dollar just made me a little bit fearful. I didn't know if I was prepared as a salesperson to do that. And so I thought, well, let me just get the mentorship from somebody else. And I had no intentions of saying I had no intentions of joining Jas' team in the first place. But I certainly had no intentions of saying I really thought all eventually grew up my own team. But it's kind of funny. I've been so immersed in this team and part of the growth of this team. I mean, it feels like my own and I could never now imagine leaving and like it would just wouldn't make any sense to me. So you really become like a family with people and real estate can be lonely. I know everyone thinks we're like out socializing all the time. It's actually a pretty lonely a pretty lonely job at times. And it can also be not just lonely but difficult when you're hearing no's all day and you need other people around you to help lift you up when you feel down. So our office here we have eight-nine people here every single day. When I'm in a bad mood, chances are they're not. When one of them's in a bad mood. I'm not. We can kind of help lift each other up. And that's been, that's been great for me. But that's what works for me. Like I felt self awareness first.

Jason Muth:

Yeah, that's great advice. I think a lot of people also feel the same way. I mean, like, we are humans, and we connect with each other. That's, that's why the pandemic was so tough on a lot of people and why mental health became such a priority to make sure that people are doing okay, people want to socialize. It's one of the reasons why people want to go back to the office, like, you know, these were graduates from college right now that graduated into a pandemic, where they just work from their bedroom at their parents house, and they their colleagues were in zoom boxes. It was you know, that's a tough way to start your career.

Laura Stewart:

I couldn't imagine quite honestly, here. Real estate was a an essential service. So we were I mean, I could have come to the office, but at the start, like no one knew what was going on. But after I think it was, like, 10-11 weeks, I was like, I'm out of here, hubby. I'm going back to the office. I need to see another face other than yours. And so I'm lucky in that regard. But yeah, I think people have had a hard time. I'm surprised quite honestly, by the amount of people who say they love working at home. That's not me at all. But it's interesting, I think the pandemic has allowed for certain jobs and positions to do from home. But to me, it's all about the culture at work. It's all about us working together, having wins together and losses together, and having some meals and some tequila together that never hurt anyone either.

Jason Muth:

Never does. Well, why don't we get to our final couple of questions that we ask all of our guests here on the podcast. And we'd love to learn a little bit more about you and how you'd answer these. And then we'll let you tell everyone how they can get a hold of you. The first question we have for you is if you can get onstage for 30 minutes and talk about any subject in the world with zero preparation. What would that be?

Laura Stewart:

My dog probably. I am a very proud fur mom, fur baby mom. What do you call those people? I have a fur baby, I guess. I mean, I just know I could talk for an hour without having to think very hard about it. He lights up my life. He makes me laugh. And I feel very, very lucky to have him in my life. So I'm not sure how exciting that would be for the audience. But for me, it would be the time of my life.

Jason Muth:

We lost our dog a couple years ago but you know, we are dog people. She was a great great companion for boy almost 14 years with us.

Laura Stewart:

What kind of dog was it?

Jason Muth:

She was a lab-vizsla mix.

Laura Stewart:

Oh, that's a good man. Yeah, I have Okay. All right, hold on.

Jason Muth:

We have a three year old and I still have Rosie on my phone. Wht does that say?

Laura Stewart:

My all my well I shouldn't say this, but a lot of my passwords are still like my dog for my childhood. There's mine, Rudy, there's my baby. So I totally get it.

Jason Muth:

Yeah that's great. Dogs are amazing. We could probably gone a lot longer than a half hour about that right? Second question we have for you tell us what happened early in your career that impacts the way that you're working today.

Laura Stewart:

So when I first started, so I went to school for nutrition. And I got my degree after four years and I thought I don't even want to work in this field. I don't even think I'd be able to get a job in this field. Because my grades weren't all that great. Like they were good, but not nothing stellar. And it's a very competitive industry to work at a hospital here in Toronto. And I dabbled in the fashion industry for a bit. So I went back to school and I got a retail buying certificate. And I was now interning at one of Canada's or Canada's leading luxury department stores called Holt Renfrew. I was interning at their head office. And this is now 2008, I start my internship. So 2009 was when the one year contract would end. And the idea was that I would get a job there. And I worked my butt off. I worked so hard at that place. I was like the first one in the last one out, they actually had to tell me to stop coming in those hours because they felt bad for everybody else. So I was just working too hard. And unfortunately 2008 I mean, we all know what happened. And guess what's the first thing that people stopped spending money on? A lot of luxury goods. And so at the end of it, the company had a hiring freeze, and they couldn't hire anyone on. And I remember I was like devastated for a day because I'd put everything into that job. But I also moved on very, very quickly. And I found another job within like two, two to three weeks, of course, then the hiring freeze came off. Then they asked me to come back and I said no, I already already left. And I'm very proud of myself for not going back because everything since then led me to where I am today. And so, you know sometimes in the moment, things don't seem like good things are happening to you and you think you've worked hard for something and life is just working against you somehow. But oftentimes, those are actually moments of severe growth and opportunity. And mostly they're moments that you're gonna look back on so fondly because you'll remember when you were down at the bottom and you felt like it couldn't get much worse and the rent check still needed to be paid and you didn't have a job and that was very stressful time but I feel like I persevered and came out the other side.

Jason Muth:

Yeah. Those years we've heard frequently on this podcast with a lot of entrepreneurs, people that had a big change, like Rory graduated law school into that same economy, lots of people lost their jobs during those years, you know, so what do you do? You pivot, we're kind of in that right now a little bit like there's, you know, some uncertainty with the economy. And I'm sure when this comes out, it'll still be uncertainty, even though inflation has started to tick down a little bit here in the US. But there has been layoffs, there have been jobs rescinded. You know, it's all over the media, the tech industry is kind of contracting a little bit. So what do you do? You know, you kind of pivot and you figure out a different direction. And sometimes that direction, leads you to a path like you're in right now Laura.

Laura Stewart:

Yeah, it's funny because of what's happening now. And I think because of my experience, in the past, I didn't get scared or nervous this time around, like, I've been through this before. And that's a great thing that age and experience teaches you that like, these things happen, and you kind of just got to get through it and figure out a way how to what we call create your own economy. And that's the one plus side about being an entrepreneur owning your own business is that you can work yourself through it, you know, obviously, as an employee, you get left, let off, that's different. And now you have to pivot figure out maybe another career path for yourself. But as a business owner, I'm able to just make more phone calls, send more emails, get more creative, start a podcast, like if people aren't busy right now, if you're real estate agent, you're not busy, how about let's start creating some content than today. Because I know when you were busy, that was your excuse, then how about now you don't have that excuse, and you actually take action. And so that's what's exciting about what we do. Because we can always just choose to work a little bit harder work a little bit differently. And that usually helps us kind of get through that that lull.

Jason Muth:

Yeah, I saw you talking about that on your social media. I think it was about the summertime, if there was a lull, you know, you should, you know, start with some content creation. And guess what, like, you know, when the pandemic hit, a lot of us didn't know what was going to happen. I know Rory and I, we talked a lot, you know, what happened two years ago, where it's like, Oh, my God, it's all ending, you know, and all our short term rentals, all the bookings ended, right. But what did we do we, you know, we regrouped. Right. And we doubled down.

Rory Gill:

Again, we recruited kept going, I think every transaction I had on the books, you know, came out of the pipeline. And it was, you know, for about a month, it was really terrifying. But then everything came back, it was an opportunity for those who wanted to persist to double down. I remember, you know, taking the extra time and going into webinars, learning new things. That's kind of the hook that I did during that time. I probably didn't produce as much content as I should have. But I took the time, that opportunity to get the learning out of the way. All those things are on the backburner, we did. And it was still terrifying. But we got through it.

Laura Stewart:

Yeah, just don't quit, right, you got to just get up, find meaning, look for something new to do. Go down the education route, like people listen to this podcast today. Kudos to you, because you're doing something to help better yourself. Now the next piece of that puzzle is actually executing on it. And I don't mean like going from zero to 100. Just do something small today that you didn't do yesterday. And then build on that every single day after that.

Jason Muth:

Yeah, question. That's great advice. By the way. Our final question, before we wrap up is tell us something that you're listening to or watching or reading these days.

Laura Stewart:

I'm actually reading it's funny, you said that because it's right here behind me. I'm reading this book, Deep Work by Cal Newport. Have you guys read this one?

Rory Gill:

No

Laura Stewart:

I probably read 10 books a year, I read the same

Jason Muth:

Nope. book again. And again, Atomic Habits, I read that one at the start of every year. This one's interesting, because this is essentially telling us to like get off our phones and be more present and focused on our work. And then we wouldn't have to work as long hours because the work that we're doing is better, which is very difficult for me, because I'm always on my phone. I'm a social media company. I'm on my phone a lot. I'm on my computer a lot. And so this is kind of eye opening to me. I have yet to take any real action using it yet, but I'm only you know, about halfway halfway through the book. And it you know, it does give some valuable lessons of using other people's stories and what they've done with the time like, I guess, you know, when you think who is it? Bill Gates even used to like go to his cottage or something and like, check out for like two weeks in the year. So strategies like that. Not that I have that kind of time, I don't think. But anyways, we'll see what I do with this. Maybe nothing. I think like I was saying earlier, like, always take that the opportunity to continue your education and to open your mind. I read it with a lot of curiosity, as opposed to being closed minded about it. I think well, what if and maybe that's possible. That's what I'm reading these days. Deep Work. Yeah, we will check that out. Thank you for bringing that to our attention. Also Atomic Habits which I Rory, have you done that one yet or no?

Rory Gill:

Nope. That's been recommended a couple of times this year. It's going on the queue.

Laura Stewart:

That's the one I feel. What Who is it James Clear who wrote that one? James, that's the book. And I actually have a habit tracker on my phone because of that book. And I track the smallest little things like exercise, not how long I exercise, just that I exercise. So whether it's a 10 minute stretch, a five minute ab workout or a 45 minute run, exercises, exercise is just about getting in that every single day so that when I totally bought into I think that's, that's why I read it again. And again, and again. Because, as I mentioned earlier, sometimes you need to hear things four, five, six, but now you say 10 times. So there you go.

Jason Muth:

Absolutely. Laura, this has been an excellent discussion about lots of different things, I wasn't exactly sure that we would go into, you know, some of these improvement topics toward the end, but I'm really glad that we did, because it's all tied together. I mean, like your journey took you through a rough economy into a real estate team into a world where you're actually working as a media producer and content creator, you know, with with one of the biggest influencers in the whole country, you know, so you certainly have your hands full with all of those endeavors. But we wanted to really, thank you for being on the podcast. You know, this has been our pleasure to host you here. And you know, we would love to continue the conversation at another time in the future because you know, this space is changing rapidly. And you guys are doing some great stuff. So you know.

Laura Stewart:

Well definitely thank you so much for having me. And I really hope you guys take us up on that tequila podcast. If you ever find yourself in Toronto, that sounds like an awesome time.

Jason Muth:

You're going to have to be the executive producer for that podcast now. We've met the brains behind the brawn.

Laura Stewart:

No, that's true. I say I'm the brains, he's the beauty, right?

Jason Muth:

So Laura, tell us where people can reach out to you or learn more about some of your endeavors. If they'd like to stalk you online or, you know, take some of your advice.

Laura Stewart:

Yeah, I would say probably I do most of my content on TikTok and Instagram, although like I said, I'm on all platforms. And you can pretty much just search the same name of Laura Stewart TO for Toronto on on any platform you on, you'll probably find me. And I would love just to you know, get your listeners ideas and thoughts about all of this, because they're really my, you know, my surveys there. They helped me understand if I'm doing things right, or if we're on to something, I love the feedback, good and bad. If it's bad, I might cry for a day, but it's okay. It helps. It helps in the future. I could take it and I yeah, I would love to start those conversations. So any social media platform.

Jason Muth:

Awesome. So go check out Laura's stuff, Laura Stewart TO on all the platforms, check out From The Ground Media, which is ftgumedia.com. We will put that in the show notes as well. You'll see some excellent blog content, some of the podcasts you're producing, you're on YouTube as well. So we'll link that up as well. So you can see some of the great productions that you've done. It's a cool demo reel. I know you have some great clients that are you doing some great work for so go watch their stuff. Go learn a lot and reach out to them. Rory, where can people reach out to you?

Rory Gill:

You can find me through my real estate brokerage NextHome Titletown Real Estate nexthometitletown.com Or my law practice UrbanVillage Legal, urbanvillagelegal.com.

Jason Muth:

Awesome. Well, Laura, thank you so much for appearing. Rory, thank you for being part of the podcast as well as our co-host. Thank you for listening. If you've stuck with us for the entire episode, we really appreciate it. And hopefully that means give us a thumbs up or a big five star rating afterward. If you want to reach out to me, you can reach me jason@nexthometitletown.com Happy to take comments book you as a guest or forward your information onto whoever needs to see it. And that's it. Laura. Thank you. This has been great.

Laura Stewart:

Thank you so much, guys. I really appreciate it.

Jason Muth:

Awesome. Thank you, Rory and thank you for listening. Bye, everyone.

Announcer:

This has been The Real Estate Law Podcast. Because real estate is more than just pretty pictures. And law goes well beyond the paperwork and courtroom arguments. were powered by NextHome Titletown Real Estate or Boston's progressive real estate brokerage. More at nexthometitletown.com and UrbanVillage Legal, Massachusetts real estate Council serving savvy property owners lenders and investors more at urbanvillagelegal.com. Today's conversation was not legal advice, but we hope you found it entertaining and informative. Discover more at the realestatelawpodcast.com Thank you for listening.