The Real Estate Law Podcast

51 - Worst to First - Overcoming Obstacles with Attorney Eric Todd Johnson

May 23, 2022 Jason Muth + Rory Gill Season 1 Episode 51
The Real Estate Law Podcast
51 - Worst to First - Overcoming Obstacles with Attorney Eric Todd Johnson
Show Notes Transcript

We are speaking with attorney and author Eric Todd Johnson in this episode of The Real Estate Law Podcast.

Eric is an experienced attorney who has confronted the challenges that arise in billion-dollar business deals and litigation.

Eric learned from his experiences, taken his training and success as a lawyer, and condensed it into his new audiobook “Worst To First," teaching people how to win at the game of life by overcoming adversity.

In this episode, we discussed:
- Overcoming obstacles and finding success in your career
- What does it take to jump from Worst to First?
- How can a lower-performing salesperson move up the ranker?
- What holds people back from their infinite potential?
- The value of patience and avoiding conflict.
- Overcoming the constant feeling of failure in a difficult market.
- Eric's legal work connecting municipalities and businesses together.
- The rewards available from high achievement and hard work.

Get in touch with Eric:
Website - https://erictoddjohnson.com/
Email - eric@publicprivatelaw.net

Join Jason Muth and Attorney / Broker Rory Gill of NextHome Titletown and UrbanVillage Legal in Boston, Massachusetts for another episode of The Real Estate Law Podcast!

#realestatepodcast #nexthome #humansoverhouses #realestate #realestateinvesting #realestateinvestor #realestatelaw #worsttofirst #overcomingadversity #overcomingobstacles #avoidingconflict
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The Real Estate Law Podcast is hosted by Jason Muth and Attorney / Broker Rory Gill.

This podcast and these show notes are not legal advice, but we hope you find both entertaining and informative.

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Eric Todd Johnson:

Life is so broad and the law applies to all aspects of life that you can't be everything to everybody. And so what you want to do is find a niche, an area where you can become very good, and you can become very helpful to others. And it is by doing that, that you then build business muscle to be helpful to others.

Announcer:

You found The Real Estate Law Podcast, because real estate is more than just pretty pictures. And law goes well beyond the paperwork and courtroom argument. If you're a real estate professional, or looking to build real estate expertise, then welcome to the conversation and discover more at realestatelawpodcast.com

Jason Muth:

Welcome to The Real Estate Law Podcast. I'm Jason Muth and we're here with a couple of attorneys in this episode, Rory, sometimes we load it up where the attorneys outnumber the non attorneys like myself. And we've done that again today with another fantastic guest Eric Todd Johnson - Rory is going to introduce in a moment, but Eric is a speaker. He's an author, and he's an attorney. And we're gonna talk about the book that he's written some of his speaking engagements and some of the amazing legal work that he's done. Eric's out in Utah, so we're gonna get a perspective of what's happening in some of the rural communities out west. And before we introduce Eric, let's introduce our other hosts Rory Gill from Nexthome Titletown Real Estate, and UrbanVillage Legal in Boston.

Rory Gill:

Hey, Jason. And I'm excited about this conversation too. And we shouldn't you know, intimidate any listeners saying that we're overloaded with attorneys today, because I think Eric has an interesting story that's highlighted in this book, but also is applicable and inspiration with anybody who is overcoming obstacles and wants to find success in their own career. So I you know, we'll get into some of the legalese, I'm sure. But I want to make sure that everybody understands that we have an exciting conversation for everybody.

Jason Muth:

Well, are you saying that having two attorneys is not exciting? It should be exciting. It's The Real Estate Law Podcast, right?

Rory Gill:

It was exciting to me. It's exciting to a handful of people as well. But we've been in for those of you are interested in listening to that. Don't worry, we have some of that ahead, too.

Jason Muth:

Eric, welcome to the podcast.

Eric Todd Johnson:

Hey, how you doing?

Jason Muth:

We are excellent. It's a beautiful day here in Boston today. So we're grateful that you've taken some time out of your day to join us, we're looking forward to hearing about the book that you've written, which is the Worst to First transformative performance guide, I love the image that you have on the front of the book, where it's very Wordle. I don't know if you've been playing Wordle. But we have change and chants in there. So I could see how those two terms are interconnected. But you know, Eric, welcome. We'd love to hear a little bit about your background. Let's talk about the book that you've written and how it's applicable to some of your travels and the people that you've met your speaking engagements. And then Rory's got a bunch of legal questions for you.

Unknown:

Yeah, let's start out with the fun stuff. Yeah, I wrote a book. It's entitled Worst to First and Worst to First, people sometimes asked me, Hey, where did you come up with that title. And it describes what happened to me. I wanted to be an attorney. But my grades were such that I was rejected by every law school to which I applied. And so I kind of moved on and went into other things. I actually was a housekeeper in a hospital. And you know, despite being rejected by every law school to which I applied, I decided to give it another try and eventually sneaked into law school. But what I found by sneaking into law school is that I was at the very bottom of my class, I was literally, the very last person admitted to my law school class. And I had the very worst grades. And so I was at the very bottom, and I knew that going in. And I just decided, you know, for me, success is going to be anything other than last place. I'll just put my head down. I'll do my best. We'll see where things fall out. It was interesting, because as Rory could affirm, you show up at law school, you have a lot of people who have been very successful at everything they've ever done. And you know, you get at least 50% of the class think that they're all going to be in the top 10%. And so that's what a lot of the folks there was shooting for. Much to my surprise at the end of the first term. When grades came out. I had straight A's which surprised me because I had never had straight A's. I had very, I'm a very average student. I graduated from high school with the 2.69 GPA. And in college, I did only slightly better at 2.73. And so I was very surprised to get straight A's. I've never done that before. Yeah, someone told me that I was top of my class. Last, I'd literally jumped from worst to first. And so the book is about what does it take to do that, because there's a variety of things. But behind them all is a very core, it's an emotional thing to be able to just jump levels like that. And that's what the book is about. It's like, Hey, if you want to jump levels, here are some things that actually work. They work for me. I've helped others learn these things. And they've worked for others. And so that's, that's what the book Worst to First is about.

Jason Muth:

That's a great story. And I think that a lot of people listening can relate to situations like that, where either they, they started somewhere that they didn't feel like they belonged. And then they worked really hard, and they moved up the food chain, or they moved up the ranker there. Or the opposite. I mean, there are situations where you might have gotten into an amazing school, when everyone else was super smart. And suddenly you find yourself at the bottom of that top ranker. And I can think about sales teams as well, you know, at least in the real estate world, or in media sales, which is where I spend my full time job, you know, there's a ranker, there's people that sell more than others. And if you're one of those folks, that's at the bottom of the ranker and you're constantly reminded of that, by sales management or by the things that you see on social media and the pressures that you get to to have peer pressure for the people on the same team as you. What are some great ways that people can start to move up that, that ranker and move up the ladder like you clearly did when you got straight A's for the first time in your life?

Unknown:

Let me tell you some things that I didn't understand then. But that I inadvertently applied that I can now, you know, talk about, you know, directly. And we've all heard the things oh, you know, you have great potential, you can do anything. We've all heard that everybody has. And you know what? There's something in us, that tells us you know what, that's true. I really, there is something about me, that actually, you know, there's some potential there. But we don't really understand where it comes from, and we don't necessarily understand how to access it. So let me kind of describe where that comes from. Okay, and if you will indulge me a little bit. Let me let me talk about things that are, are limited and finite versus things that are infinite. Okay. So our physical bodies are limited and finite, we can only be in one place at one time. And to move from one location to another takes time. Okay, that's just the way of finite things as the way of the physical world. One thing in one place, and to move takes time to get somewhere else. However, not all of our faculties are so finite and limited. Let me point you to our thoughts. In my body, I cannot move forward in time for backward in time. I can only be here right now. That's it. It's limited and finite. But in my thought, I can easily go backward in time. I can remember Christmas and I can remember childhood, I can remember all sorts of things, right? It's easy for me to travel backward in time and thought. Likewise, I can project forward in time this weekend, I'm going down to Kanab, Utah, I'm going to go hike some slot canyons out in the barren desert where you know what I'm going to unplug, there's no cell phone access, it's going to be wonderful. And, you know, last night, I'm planning that with my wife and and we're traveling forward in time, we can go backward in time. In addition, we're not stuck to one location, we've probably all experienced the situation where hey, you're, you're you're somewhere and you're thinking about something else and someone tries to get your attention. They try to talk to you. And of course you hear them, but it doesn't register. You have traveled somewhere else in your mind, other than where you are. And so our thoughts are not limited by time our thoughts are not limited by location. In that respect. Our thoughts are literally infinite. And that's one of the reasons when you know when we hear oh, you have great potential. It's like you As you do you literally have infinite potential, literally. So what I just described about thoughts? Well, let me just pause there and kind of, you know, see if you have any questions about what I just explained,

Rory Gill:

Not about the concept. So if you have all this infinite potential, what holds people back from kind of realizing, realizing that infinite potential?

Unknown:

Part of it is, in a lot of respects, people don't actually understand that they have it. They sense it, they may be informed about it, but quite frankly, they don't even pause to go, oh, wait a minute, my thought really is limited. My next thought can be anything. So often, we tether our future, to our mistakes of the past. And we say Oh, because of mistakes of the past, I'm limited. False, not at all. Your next thought can be anything, it's literally unlimited, infinite. And that is what your future is based on. Your future is not based on what happened yesterday. Your future is based on your next thought. So much as our thoughts are infinite. Likewise, our feelings are infinite. Let me give the example of of a military soldier. My my father in law was a Navy assault, and he was often posted halfway around the world. And the love for his wife did not dissipate just because he wasn't standing next to her. When he was in Hong Kong. His love for her was just as ardent as it was when he was able to come home. So location does not diminish our feelings, it does not diminish the love that we feel likewise time, there can be prolonged absences, and that does not necessarily dissipate the feelings that we have. In fact, the adage absence causes the heart to grow fonder, right? It can be that even in the absence, those emotions amplify in magnitude. And so like our thoughts or feelings, likewise, are infinite in nature. And of course, we all have an infinite spiritual capacity as well. But I'll leave that for others to talk about.

Jason Muth:

Right. So what are some of the examples that that you've given in your book about people climbing from worst to first and maybe some of the different ways that they achieve

Eric Todd Johnson:

The fact is, is that it gets achieved in all that? different walks of life in all sorts of amazing ways. Let me give you an example of my friend Roy, who I will be meeting with shortly after this podcast. Roy was a farmer in India. And he landed in the United States back in 1997. And all they would allow him to bring with him was $50 in his pocket, that's all. That's all he could immigrate with. And he had a relative out in Kramer Junction, California, kind of down by Barstow. And so he went to stay with them. And his English had a thick foreign accent. He did speak English, but it was a thick accent. And so one day someone that passed through there was - he got to know him a little bit he was selling oranges and he would take oranges down to LA but the LA market only one a Grade A oranges. And Roy said what do you do with your grade two orange oranges, you know, the the next step down and the guy said, well, there just isn't, you know, the same market for him. So he strikes a deal with him. He says, Hey, sell me a bushel for 40 bucks. So he buys a bushel of oranges. And then he gets some bags, and he bags this up and five and 10 pound bags. And he goes and stands out on the street corner at a stoplight. And as people stop at the stoplight, he sells oranges through the car window. And the prices he charged it ended up being about $200 a bushel that people were paying. And he was apparently good enough at it that every day he was selling out. And that worked really well until fall came and oranges were out of season. And he found himself you know, out of out of the market. So then Roy decided to turn to something else and there was a gas station on the corner. So we went to the owner of the gas station he said Hey, is it okay with you if I wash the windows of the cars when they stop to get gas. He said, You don't have to pay me anything. I'll just wash their windows. And I won't ask them for anything. But just out of the goodness of their hearts, they'll they'll give me a little something. And the gas station owner said, yep, it doesn't cost me anything. Okay, that's fine with me. And so he started doing that. And back in that day, minimum wage was about $4.75 an hour. And Roy found that just on the tips from washing people's windows, when they stopped at the gas station, he was making about 11 bucks an hour. Okay, so here we have Roy that he struggles to get a job because his English isn't that great. He has no formal education. He's a farmer, no, no college or anything he can, he can read and he can write, but no formal education. And he's just finding his own ways to make ends meet. It was at this point that a cousin came to him and said, I haven't been back to India to see my mother in 20 years, I have a dry cleaning business. And to go back to India for a month or so to visit my mom, I need to leave it in the hands of someone that I trust. He said, would you run my dry cleaning business for a month? And Roy said, If you'll train me for, you know, until I get comfortable? Yeah, I'll do that. So Roy did that. And after the end of that month, we understood the dry cleaning business. And so when his cousin asked him, he said, Okay, what do you want for pay, Roy, he said, I don't want money. He said, what I want you to do is connect me with the people and show me how to open a dry cleaning business. And so I went to another community, so it wasn't competing with this cousin. And he opened a dry cleaning business. And it was successful enough that three years later, he sold out for half a million dollars. And he took that money and he bought into a hotel. And now he owns 11 hotels, he owns restaurants, he owns 5,000 acres with oil wells on them. He is a multi multi millionaire, and has just, you know, financially been tremendously successful. So that's the type of thing that happens when people just kind of take their own initiative. Here's someone who had no advantages that ended up being highly successful.

Jason Muth:

It's like the story of trading a paperclip up to a house. I don't know if you've heard that. There's someone who I just saw recently that was doing that where you trade one thing for the next for the next for the next next thing, you know, you've traded into this huge asset. I'm guessing Roy - Roy was probably smart with the money that he was earning and then investing. But were there any particular life skills that you think allowed him to be to be able to kind of work his way up that ladder in that manner? Was it the way he approached business relationships or willingness to learn? Or what do you think it might have been?

Unknown:

One of the keys to Roy's success is, you know, as an immigrant, and you know, the color of his skin was not always the most welcome color in business circles. Roy approached his business very humbly. And so for example, when he opened his dry cleaning, business, it was down in Barstow, California. And the reason that he sold out was because it was so successful, he needed to go to 24/7 service to keep up with the demand that you know, just the amount of stuff people were bringing him to dry clean. Well, in the strip mall where he was the anchor tenant was a grocery store, and they didn't want a dry cleaning business open 24/7. And Roy could have complained to the owner of the of the strip, excuse me of the strip mall. But instead he realized look, that it's not going to do me any good to take on this big grocery store who is the anchor tenant for the strip mall. I'm just going to cause rancor If I fight this. And so Roy decided, hey, look, I'm I'm just going to I'm going to sell out instead, frankly. And that's been something that has guided him throughout his business transactions - he is patient and humble in his approach to business. He is fastidious about avoiding conflict. If there's conflict, he just backs off. And he waits until an opportunity arises. And if he can't seem to avoid the conflict, then he decides to find opportunity elsewhere.

Rory Gill:

I want to circle back a little bit and how this fits into your story of going from literally worst to first. I know your background is very different from Roy's that the industries you worked in a very different from Roy's just the personal story on the surface is very different. But you do see in his story, something analogous to what you went through, going from worst to first?

Unknown:

Yeah, let me draw the connection for you. So when I got to law school, like I said, it was emotionally difficult to know that I was last. It is kind of like, it's kind of like having a 50 pound ball and chain that you're dragging around knowing your own flaws and weaknesses. And Emotionally, I had to just let that go and say, You know what the past is the past, I can't change the past. I have to just be buoyant about today. Even with that buoyancy, the first and only thing that was graded before are so law school, as you know, Rory, is graded on one comprehensive final exam for each class. Okay. The only exception to that was our writing class where we had a midterm paper. And so the only only grade feedback that I had before our first term grades were returned to us was this mid term paper, and I got a D minus on it. I got such a low D minus it was just barely above failing, the professor just didn't have the heart to fail me right out of the gate. You know, it's very tempting to say, Yeah, I'm just not cut out for this. I was, I started last, I'm still last. It's where I'm always going to be. So emotionally, I had to corral myself and say, You know what, I'm still going to give my best every day, I'm still going to have a chipper buoyant approach to every day, just like Roy, even when he in in key encountered opposition. And he decided, you know, I'm not going to struggle against it. Instead, I'm just going to find a path open to me, where I can be caring for others, where I can be hopeful every day and avoid discouragement. Okay. And so that's what I had to do in law school as well. I had to literally sidestep discouragement that was coming at me hard. Our feelings are infinite. And so by sidestepping that discouragement and saying, You know what, I choose feelings that are uplifting. I choose to remain optimistic, instead of discouraged, and even depressed. I had a classmate who pulled me aside one day, and his name was Greg, and he said, Eric, I was the very next-to-last person admitted to our law school class. He says, I know because they told me that when I was admitted, and he, he then told me when he was admitted, right. And I just sat there, and I listened. And I said, Oh, Greg, it's so great that you're here. And, you know, I'm so glad that I get to be your friend and in our acquaintance. Well, the fact that he was next to last weighed on him, and he dropped out. I never told Greg that I knew I was the last person admitted, right. And I knew because what he told me when he was admitted is like, yeah, I was admitted after him. And so he let that weigh him down, and he dropped out. I just move past that and decided stay buoyant and enthusiastic every day. And I was able to move forward as a result. Roy did the same way. He ran into any number of discouragements. But he just moved past the discouragements he didn't struggle against them.

Jason Muth:

Rory, how do you see that as kind of a lesson for some of the people in your world in the real estate world that you're today. I mean, like it's very, very difficult market out there right now, I'm guessing there's a lot of agents that might be listening to this looking for any kind of glimmer of hope, and how to how to overcome that constant feeling of failure.

Rory Gill:

Well so I mean, the framework here is the finite and infinite is often think about the kind of external and internal limiting factors that that impact everybody. So whether it's somebody who's, you know, you can analogize, this however you want, but in the case of a real estate agent, who maybe is not confident to really start their business, a lot of that limitation is purely internal, a lack of, you know, internal belief, a lack of really believing in the possibilities. But a lot of that also gets projected off into external factors saying, the, you know, it's the market, it's, the inventory is too tight, it's just a difficult business to break into, when really, it's a lack of the confidence and the, the ability to really perceive themselves as success stories. And they're the ones that are holding themselves back. You know, the stories like this for anybody in a, in a business, when they can look around and say, well, somebody who, you know, was in a tougher position than even they were, were able to kind of take it one step at a time, have a confidence, and grow their business, because they can imagine something bigger at the end.

Eric Todd Johnson:

Very true.

Jason Muth:

Why don't we shift a little bit because I'd love to hear about some of the legal work that you've done. Eric, I know that before we hit record, we were talking a little bit about some of the municipal work. And Rory probably has a couple of questions that are related to that, that are that are a little legal specific.

Rory Gill:

I mean, the first thing I want to talk to somebody is asking them how they found their their field, because law is certainly not just one big career path where it all looks the same. So how did you find your niche in the in the legal field?

Unknown:

Great, thank you. So let me tell you what I what I tell younger attorneys that I work with, and and even if I mentor some law students as well each year, and tell them as I said, Look, life is so broad, and the law applies to all aspects of life, that you can't be everything to everybody. And so what you want to do is find a niche, an area where you can become very good, and you can become very helpful to others. And it is by doing that, that you then build business muscle to be helpful to others. So my area of expertise is public private law. And I work with municipalities and businesses to work together to accomplish things that they really neither side could accomplish on their own. To bring prosperity to communities, as well as to help businessmen to prosper in their businesses. It's been very rewarding, because I feel like I get to help people. That doesn't mean that everything I do every day is just really exciting. There, there always seems to be a little bit of sawdust in every sandwich, so to speak. But you focus on on the good parts, and you keep moving forward through those challenges. And what really becomes gratifying is figuring out how to accomplish things that others have decided cannot be done. And for the things that that I've gotten to work on, you know, I've had other attorneys literally write legal opinions explaining why it was impossible, and why it was illegal. And submit that to my clients and say, you need to stop. And I've come back and explained to my clients and fortunately, they had confidence in me and say, Look, no, this this is legal. It's not even on the edge of legality. Here's where it squarely fits within legal parameters, and you can safely do this without taking legal risk and move forward. And that's just been very rewarding and very gratifying because with that approach, we've been able to accomplish things that people thought were impossible. Let me give an example. Here in Utah, there is an area called the Uinta Basin that is surrounded by high mountains. The three major passes into the USA basin are Strawberry Pass at 8,000 feet, Indian Canyon Pass at 9,000 feet, and Douglas Pass out of Colorado at 10,000 feet. And so there's never been railroad into the Uinta Basin. And because getting through the mountains has been so difficult. Literally for 100 years, I've looked back at records, county records from the 1920s - 1921, when easements were recorded, to try and get railroad into the Uinta Basin. And just in December of 2021, one of my clients was able to get a railroad permitted into Uinta Basin, which people told us would be impossible. And yeah, we're gearing up to, to build a railroad into the Uinta Basin and something that people had literally been trying to do for 100 years, and that our detractors told us, this is pie in the sky. And they would point to everybody who tried to do it, who had failed. And they said, You're just wasting your time and effort to try and do this. And here we are with the permit to move forward.

Rory Gill:

Congratulations, I mean that that's problem solving on a pretty grand scale. And you know, my perception of your practice area is that you really are working to come up with innovative solutions for these these kinds of large scale problems. And you're taking private businesses and public government and trying to get them to work together. And my question kind of in that sphere is - Do you feel like you're taking two entities, two kind of disparate interests that want to work together, but just don't know, how are you actually convincing them that they should be working together in the first place?

Unknown:

You're exactly right. They don't know how. But, but what we've learned is that government is better at some things than the private sector. So for example, the private sector, they have a fairly short window of saying, is this going to be profitable. And if there isn't some assurances within that short window, then they're hesitant to invest there. However, the government, cities don't go away, they can have a much longer term perspective. Also, one thing that governments are good at is regulation and regulatory issues. They those regulations often frustrate the private sector, and understandably so. So what what my clients have learned is that if they will take on some of the regulatory burden that they can get, they can de-risk the business side. And then as as they take on that regulatory burden, and they show the private side, hey, we've de-risked this than the private side literally rushes into the opportunity. They're like, yes, we want in now that you have shown us that we can get over those hurdles, those regulatory hurdles, then we're all in. It was those regulatory hurdles that were holding us back?

Jason Muth:

You know, the lesson that I'm taking, as the non attorney here is, is sometimes if you approach a problem from multiple angles, you'll eventually find the right angle to kind of get in there. And it's not necessarily asking the same question the same way, 10 times and expecting a different result, the 10th. But persistence, I think is important with everything we've discussed today, and maybe figuring out how to solve a problem a different way. And you actually might get something approved, you know, by taking on some of that risk as as a developer or as someone on the private side. You know, perhaps that's how government might understand how to work with a private developer in this situation.

Unknown:

Yeah, you said something that sparked a memory of something that a very successful Basketball Coach Bobby Knight said one time, he said the essence of coaching is figuring out how to say the same thing 1,000 different ways. And, yes, you're tackling the same problem, but you just keep coming at it from many different angles, until you find the one that clicks and works.

Jason Muth:

Well, Eric, I really love your story of persistence and climbing from worst to first. You know, it's a story that I think a lot of people who are listening can can relate to and if you are listening to this and would like a copy of the book If you go to Eric's website, erictoddjohnson.com, there are plenty of links there that you can find your way to. I found my way to the audio audible version of that, but there's a hardcopy version as well, right that?

Unknown:

No, actually the book is published by Nightingale Conant. Okay, with, they have authors like Earl Nightingale, Zig Ziglar, Napoleon Hill, you know, all the all the the high end motivational speakers, but they specialize in audio programs, not in not in hardcopy, so it's only available in, in audio.

Jason Muth:

All right, well, that explains why I couldn't find the link to the hardcopy. And you know, we are a audiobook household here. So you know, everything we listen to, every whenever we say we read a book we really just listen to it. So Eric, if if you wouldn't mind, we'd love to ask the final three questions that we ask them all of our guests just to get to know you a little bit better and to wrap up the interview. So we'll get into the first question. The first question is something that I'm sure, you do this all the time, with your public speaking in and all the work that you've done on the speaker circuit. But if you can get on stage for half hour and talk about something extemporaneously that you have no preparation on, what would that subject be?

Unknown:

You know, it'd be tied to what we've already talked about, I just love to help people. I love it when the light goes on in their eyes, about their, their unlimited capacity. And they're like, that's it. I knew it. I knew there was something there, right? They couldn't put their finger on it, but they knew it. And I love to talk to them about things like that I love to talk to them about concepts. Let me mention that the concept of power, our society teaches that greater control equals greater power, and greater power results in greater control. This, however, is a fallacy. greater power comes from greater unity. The power in our society, we say, well, we have greater control. It's like you only have greater control in a democracy if more people agree with you, and go along. Greater power is derived from greater unity, and focus on the unity not the control. That can be very helpful to many people.

Rory Gill:

The ability to lead not the ability to coerce.

Eric Todd Johnson:

Exactly.

Jason Muth:

I think that's very relevant to the world that we're living in today also, with everything going on.

Eric Todd Johnson:

Yeah.

Jason Muth:

Second question. Tell us something that happened early on in your life or career that impacts the way that you're working today.

Unknown:

Golly, I don't know, I don't know that there's any one defining moment. But I can, I can certainly tell you that as the kid who grew up, applauding politely as others receive the rewards that I sought, it certainly was transitional to suddenly jump to the head of my class, I really didn't understand the rewards that went with that. It's been if nothing else, I went from someone, the last person admitted to my class after my grades came out. The Dean of the Law School called me and he said, Hey, actually, we have scholarships for people who perform as well as you do. And so I went from wondering how I was going to pay for law school, to being on scholarship, and having people approach me and say, Hey, will you come work for us? While many of my classmates couldn't find work? And, you know, there. It was unexpected to me. I really, I didn't expect that I didn't even know it was possible. I had just never, I had just never played on that field before.

Jason Muth:

that's a great lesson for us all. Our final question for you is tell us something that you're watching or listening to or reading these days.

Unknown:

You know, I spend an hour to two hours a day in emotional spiritual preparation. So I tend to devour materials such as the Bhagavad Gita, the Holy Bible, the Quran, the Zend Avesta of the Parsi, Zoroastrian faith, the Upanishads. So recently I've been digging through the Upanishads and the Rigveda from the Hindu tradition. And I just love the truths that I find there. And I find that they, they helped me keep that balance when the world seems to get crazy.

Jason Muth:

Rory, I don't think we've heard anyone cite those texts yet on this podcast, so.

Rory Gill:

Or just the variety and diversity of them too, and finding inspiration and all of them, s.o

Jason Muth:

Kudos to you.

Unknown:

Everyone has truth. And I love learning truth from everyone. I meet.

Jason Muth:

And with that, those are some amazing words to live by. I feel like there's a lot of sound bites from this that we'll have to pull out and re-listen to, again, because I think it's, it's worth what you've spoken about is something that I think that you know, requires a lot of thinking. And, you know, for people that are really looking to change the position in which they find themselves, you know, running through it, taking the inventory and following some of your guidance is probably a good next step for them. So, Eric, I'm going mention it. We'll put this on the show notes. I'll put the link to your website, erictoddjohnson.com in there so people can easily find find you in case they have any questions. Your contact info is also on the website. Rory, how can people find you?

Rory Gill:

I'm easy to find at NextHome Titletown, nexthometitletown.com or UrbanVillage Legal, urbanvillagelegal.com. Great.

Jason Muth:

And we appreciate your listening to The Real Estate Law Podcast. If you've enjoyed this, we'd love it if you subscribe, or if you give us a thumbs up or comment and we read them all and we respond to them all. So thank you so much, Eric, thank you for appearing on the podcast. This is great. We appreciate your coming on. And Rory, thank you once again. Thank you for being a co host and for everyone. I'm Jason, and thank you for listening.

Rory Gill:

Thank you.

Announcer:

This has been The Real Estate Law Podcast. Because

Eric Todd Johnson:

Thanks. real estate is more than just pretty pictures. And law goes well beyond the paperwork and courtroom arguments. were powered by NextHome Titletown greater Boston's progressive real estate brokerage. More at nexthometitletown.com and UrbanVillage Legal, Massachusetts real estate counseling serving savvy property owners, lenders and investors more at urbanvillagelegal.com. Today's conversation was not legal advice, but we hope you found it entertaining and informative. Discover more at realestatelawpodcast.com Thank you for listening!