The Real Estate Law Podcast

45 - Real Estate Mentoring and Coaching with Team Leader Ryan Glass

April 05, 2022 Jason Muth + Rory Gill Season 1 Episode 45
The Real Estate Law Podcast
45 - Real Estate Mentoring and Coaching with Team Leader Ryan Glass
Show Notes Transcript

During this episode of The Real Estate Law Podcast, Rory meets with Ryan Glass, Vice President at Gibson Sotheby’s International Realty, located right here in Boston.

It's a good ol' fashioned meeting of the minds between Boston real estate agents. Hear them chat about the local market, sure. You will hear their take on sale trends and market shifts over the past two years.

But the discussion encompasses much more than what's happening here in Boston! 

Ryan earned his real estate license at only 19, sold his first home at 20, and started listing million dollar properties at 26.  He built his business and reputation on authenticity, integrity, and end-to-end service. And all of that has paid off - in 2021, Ryan ranked in the top 1.5% nationwide of all real estate agents in the U.S.

In this episode, we talk about:
-- The definition of a "Team" within a Real Estate Brokerage
-- The Spring Market in Boston
-- Video marketing for real estate agents
-- Building real human connections
-- Balancing marketing with client service
-- How the job changed from when the market was a little more balanced
-- The trickiness of dual agency transactions
-- Encouraging buyers to tour all types of properties to understand the market
-- The danger of sellers pushing too hard and being greedy
-- When it makes sense to sell a property off-market
-- Shifts in buyers' preferences since 2019
-- Changes with millennial buyers who suddenly have more buying power
-- Trying to get clients out for a cup of coffee or a drink and away from Zoom
-- Being conservative with savings and learning from the COVID shutdown

Get in touch with Ryan Glass:
Ryan's website - https://ryanjglass.com/
Email Ryan Glass - ryan.glass@gibsonsir.com
Ryan Explains It All on YouTube -
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjei8fzA3yIi9hhcH6JwxDg/videos

Join Jason Muth and Attorney / Broker Rory Gill of NextHome Titletown and UrbanVillage Legal in Boston, Massachusetts for another episode of The Real Estate Law Podcast!

#realestatepodcast #nexthome #humansoverhouses #realestate #realestateinvesting #realestateinvestor #realestatelaw #bostonrealestate
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The Real Estate Law Podcast is hosted by Jason Muth and Attorney / Broker Rory Gill.

This podcast and these show notes are not legal advice, but we hope you find both entertaining and informative.

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Ryan Glass:

I know what my one of my best skills is. It's mentoring and coaching. And that's both with my team. And that's also with my clients. And I do an extremely good job educating my clients in the market. I give them tons of market data from the beginning. I go with them to open houses. I, you know, I really make sure they're learning the value and you learn right away if buyers are going to be realistic or not realistic, and if you can see that they're unrealistic, and they're just not connecting the dots when you're doing what you're supposed to be doing as an agent, then, I'm like, I move right on.

Announcer:

You found The Real Estate Law Podcast, because real estate is more than just pretty pictures. And law goes well beyond the paperwork and courtroom argument. If you're a real estate professional, or looking to build real estate expertise, then welcome to the conversation and discover more at realestatelawpodcast.com

Rory Gill:

You found The Real Estate Law Podcast I'm Rory Gill your host and today we're joined by Ryan Glass, Vice President at Gibson Sotheby's, a fellow local Boston realtor, and we're going to take a have an interesting discussion about what's the market looks like how things are changing in the market. But first, I just wanted to introduce Ryan, I'm very happy to have this conversation. Hey, Ryan, how are you?

Ryan Glass:

Doing Great. Thanks for having me on.

Rory Gill:

Tell us a little bit about you. You are a Vice President. You're a team leader at Gibson Sotheby's? Is that right?

Ryan Glass:

Correct. Yep. So I've been with Gibson Sotheby's since 2013. Me and my team, we service Boston Metro and South Shore, where I grew up.

Rory Gill:

Alright. And you know, for some of the people who in real estate offices knew all about this, some are not we talk about a team in a real estate brokerage, you know, what does that mean?

Unknown:

So everyone runs it very differently, which is what I always find really, really interesting. For me, personally, I just love coaching and mentoring. So having agents, you know, basically work on my team and be able to help them grow their business, for me is a lot of fun. But it also just provides me a lot more support for myself and my clients and allows me to grow my business.

Rory Gill:

When I work with teams, you know, they do come in all different shapes and sizes, but a well functioning team helps really helps the client in the end, because if they're the coverage, they need something done, it's not just about one person being available. So you're joining us, you know, as we're speaking, we're heading into the spring market, which is, you know, in this area, this is the key time of year for us to get ready for you in our offseason. If we have such a thing these days. What does that look like for you? What are you preparing? What are you working on for the winter in the holidays.

Ryan Glass:

So like you said, this is our busiest time. So what I tend to do is I completely switch gears around November. And I usually think I have about three months to implement anything new. So if I want to hire someone new to train them, that's the time to do it. I just brought on an assistant in November. So just focusing on training him and getting him up to speed, you know, teaching him how to write offers, you know, just you know, in teaching us systems and processes for him to follow marketing efforts, any kind of new marketing push that I want to try and do that's usually implemented in that time, like that three month window, where we are slower than typical with clients, you just have to implement so much if you have any chance of trying to have something new in place, fully functioning in time for spring,

Rory Gill:

You know, what are some of the marketing efforts that you're implementing this year?

Unknown:

So this year, I did a whole new website, it was something that was spent on my back burner for a long time, like when I was you know, new, I just went out and got basically the cheapest website, I could because I was trying to save money at the time. And it was nice for then. But for where my career's gone, I'm like, I need something a little bit more impressive. So that was a big push this year. And it was a lot of fun just had, you know, working with a web, a professional web developer, and having that rolled out. And then one thing I'm doing this year is trying to do a lot more with video marketing, I just launched a YouTube series, Ryan Explains It All. I think every real estate agent right now is trying to do something with video and none of us quite know what to do. It's always you know, I think been just trying something new with your marketing, even if it's a total flop, you know, just to see if it works. And if it gains traction and learn from it.

Rory Gill:

I'm very much the mindset or and I'm a hypocrite as well. But I'm very much of the mindset that video marketing is our future. That's how we can, you know, make connections with people. That's how we can educate our clients. And that's how we can provide real value in an age where the listings for the most part are available for everybody to see online. And a lot of the basic information is out there. So we need to find a way to really cut through the noise and connect with people. At the same time. It's very uncomfortable for somebody who's not used to it to get on there and create these videos.

Ryan Glass:

Absolutely. When I started, you know so my old job was public relations and marketing content creation. So I was filming myself trying to make these videos and I knew they were were terrible. So I was watching them with like my trained eye, like these are awful. I'm not good on film. And it really took me a good two months, I think of practicing and getting comfortable filming myself getting comfortable, you know, being on camera and not being self conscious about it. And once I got past that point, then it became a lot of fun.

Rory Gill:

Is I mean is that the lesson for agents who want to get into video marketing is just to do it into practice, and then eventually you'll find your stride?

Ryan Glass:

Yeah, I mean, I kept just trying to think about, you know, how am I with a client? You know, and if a client of mine was watching these videos, would it seem like me? Would they look at the videos and say, oh, yeah, that's Ryan, what would it feel forced? Would it not feel natural. And so the more I was just practicing, the more I kept trying to think of topics and things I talked about my clients regularly, which definitely then helped, I think, make it a little more natural.

Rory Gill:

I remember working with an agent on my team, when video was very new to him. And it surprised me because he was so good with speaking with people, he's such a natural conversationalist, and then I put the camera up, and he couldn't get any words out. And I chuckled, and then I would turn around to do it myself. And I absolutely know what that what that felt like, just putting your natural self out there. It's a challenge. But it really has to be done.

Ryan Glass:

I think it's such a great way of connecting with just your clients getting, we're giving away for even potential clients to know who you are, you know, when true personality wise. And I think there's such a value add to video that is lost in other forms of marketing,

Rory Gill:

You know, you put it together as a as kind of a web series on the channel, and you've packaged up quite nicely. And we'll title it is Ryan Explains It All, you know, how have you had a good response? How was that channel been received with your clients and your prospective clients.

Ryan Glass:

So it's definitely a lot harder than I expected to get it out there, you know, I find that the distribution itself is definitely challenging, especially a YouTube channel, it's really hard to get people to it. I've been uploading all the videos, also to my LinkedIn. And so that's definitely gained a lot more traction, the YouTube channel has been really hard to build up, but the people who see it, they've been reaching out and getting a kick out of it. And one thing I've been doing is because I'm trying to build my outgoing referral business as I've been highlighting agents within Sotheby's in different markets, who I've sent referrals to just to sort of remind my network that I have contacts everywhere and that's been really well received the agents that I've been featuring have been have like loved being featured, they're sharing it to their social channels. So I think it's a little bit also have a maybe a quality over quantity, you know, like, I might not have this huge following building from it, but the following that I am getting from it, it's really hitting home with those people.

Rory Gill:

No, I love that. And it's it's doing what it's supposed to do. It's not necessarily a broadcast message meant for all eyes and everybody that's out there, it's it's meant to actually build those real human connections that power your business. You know, with that in mind, so you know, video marketing. The other thing we do do video messaging at all with your, with your clients and your connections?

Ryan Glass:

Oh, like sending them videos?

Rory Gill:

Yes.

Ryan Glass:

Not really, um, I use the audio feature on the iPhone a ton, like, okay, like calling, a lot of times, I'm just giving quick updates of their transaction. So it's easier just to kind of pour myself into the phone than sending a text. And I'd love that feature of iPhone.

Rory Gill:

Okay, well, I love that you found a way to do it, you know, part of the challenge we have and kind of cutting through and communicating is getting through just a lot of email chatter, but reaching people with how they want to communicate. Phone calls aren't great for everybody for every update. So you're actually giving me a good idea that I've never tried. And that's just using the audio update. You know, we've been working on smart, short little video snippets to send to people in our communications and part of that's been well received. Also, it gets a better response rate than I would say an email does. But it takes me just as many tries to get a video out especially when I'm when I'm cold as it does putting together professional broadcast video.

Ryan Glass:

I have been reusing a lot of the Ryan Explains It All videos in my email newsletter. So there's something that's, you know, like I might do affiliate of the month and just highlight that one agent opposed to all of them, you know, or taking little pieces that I've used and repurposing them. And that's been pretty effective to with my email communications.

Rory Gill:

I mean, do you get to recycle the content that you create? If you create it for one purpose do you get to kind of take snippets and everything and reuse it for different audiences.

Ryan Glass:

So I fully admit that this is where I get lazy. You know, riding around with my head cut off showing properties trying to get deals done. The marketing is the first thing that falls off of your radar when you're just trying to service your clients. So I'm always looking for ways to repurpose pretty much any form of my marketing as much as I possibly can. To be more efficient.

Rory Gill:

Okay, good in had many great ideas didn't always implement the way it should. But some of those conversations that you'd have out in the field with your clients are actually the ones that you'd want to modify and record and use for content, because those are the explanations you're giving on a daily basis when you're out and about. So why not take that knowledge and show it off to the world?

Ryan Glass:

Absolutely.

Rory Gill:

But no, you're you're running around and doing a lot of work, particularly in the coming months. It's not a big revelation to say to people that this is a really challenging market, particularly for buyers, this is a seller's market. That's true here in Boston, though, I don't think we're by any means alone in the country. It's a very challenging market for buyers, what does it look like for you, when you go to work with your buyers in this atmosphere? How is your job changed from when the market was a little more balanced?

Ryan Glass:

Sure. So we definitely have just been as a team looking for off markets as much as we possibly can. I don't personally even like doing dual agency very often. But that has come up a lot more this year, especially simply because inventory is just so low, that when you get a listing, I think your chances now are so much higher that it overlaps with existing buyers. So in the past, me and the team, we've sort of always sorta strayed away from doing dual agency, because it is a trickier transaction, I think there's more liability on our end as the agent, but, you know, I think we've hit a point where inventory is just so low, it's a disservice to our buyer to not do dual agency simply because it makes us uncomfortable. And you know, with our sellers, what I've learned is just give them both the exact same advice, you know, I share the exact same comps with both the buyer and the seller. And I give them both my honest opinion in terms of value. And then I let each party decide, you know how they're going to proceed, I find that it's, you know, it's easier to navigate than I used to think and as long as you're transparent with both parties, that it can actually work out really well. And it's helping those buyers in a time when there is again, just no inventory. And then just like I said, looking for off markets, cold calling agents that I know who sell a lot in certain areas and asking what they have coming on, you know, I am actually doing one right now off market, it was great value. And, you know, sometimes people want the convenience of off market, you know, this was an investor owned unit that they were worried about, you know, getting it show ready with the tenants, you know, the tenants wanted to stay in place while I had an investor buyer who wanted a place with tenants already there. So you know, things like that sometimes, you know, if you if you just hit the pavement, basically trying to find inventory for your buyers, you get lucky.

Rory Gill:

Sticking on the buyer side, you know, has, I found that I'm working a lot more with the buyers before they put the offer in. And that's where I'm adding more value than it used to getting them ready. Because from the moment that they identify something that they want to the time they have to take action, it's so small that the work has to be front loaded, meaning getting them ready to pre approve was kind of the obvious thing, but even just kind of walking through, particularly new homebuyers the emotions that they're going to experience with with that first offer.

Ryan Glass:

Absolutely. I mean, we spend a lot of time just coaching our buyers on the market, you know, I find that the faster you get them to realize just how competitive this market is, the better you teach them what things cost as early on encouraging them to see everything regardless if they like the photos or not. All of that helps if they find something they fall in love with. Especially when you're sending them comps and and you know they've seen them in person. Remember that one when we saw and looked at a brick wall. And that's why it's sold so low, you know, things you tell from just pictures, you've see why the value was what it was from in-person. And so, you know, especially if someone has a tighter budget, we tell them, you need to look at everything, it doesn't matter if you like how it looks or not, it might be a comp down the road when you find something you fall in love with. And that then makes it a lot easier for you to know what to bid and you're not just taking our word for it.

Rory Gill:

Mm hmm. One thing like we don't have to talk about because it's kind of a, it's not a glamorous decision. But do you have to ration your time and, you know, make sure that you've taking out buyers who really are truly ready to offer. You know, we don't like saying that, but do we have to prioritize certain people who are better and who are more ready, willing and able to go actually.

Ryan Glass:

I have no shame saying it. I don't like people who waste my time. Yeah

Rory Gill:

No, good!

Ryan Glass:

I've learned, you know, this is my logic is I know what my one of my best skills is. It's mentoring and coaching and that's both with my team and that's also with my clients. And I do an extremely good job educating my clients in the market. I give them tons of market data from the beginning. I go with them to open houses I you know, I really make sure they're learning the value and you learn right away if buyers are going to be realistic or not realistic, and if you can see that they're unrealistic and they're just not connecting the dots when you're doing what you're supposed to be doing as an agent, then I move right on, I just go on and get new clients. But most people, I think if you give them the right information, they, you know, they learn it, and they understand it, you know, it's not often that I feel like I'm working with buyers who just aren't, it's just not clicking Add a few here and there, you know, over the past year, but you spot it really quickly.

Rory Gill:

The other kind of side of the equation here is when we get to work with sellers, and one of my fears is that a really strong seller's market is actually kind of breeding some, you know, bad habits among real estate agents, because it's not necessarily that difficult to sell a property period, if that's the end goal, it's not that difficult to sell in this market for seller. So you know, what are some things you're doing to make sure that you're giving your seller better options in this market, that they're still doing more than just selling the property and also making getting yourself ready for the inevitable year when the market's going to shift?

Ryan Glass:

Sure. I mean, I still think it is possible, believe it or not, even in this crazy market to overprice the property. And when you have a listing, the nice thing is you do get to call the shots, but you have to be pricing it in a place that you know, is going to just create an insane bidding war. And once you have that, then you're able to, you know, dictate the terms for the seller, you know, hopefully get waived inspections, hopefully get, you know, either cash or you know, very high high high down payments and get the pick of the litter. But sellers, I will say, they're getting extremely greedy and difficult in this market, and especially the ones who are in the process of buying themselves. Like it's almost like they want a back and then taking out their frustrations of their buying process on their current buyers. And so just making sure that you're managing the sellers expectations, just making sure that you know, if they're being unreasonable, you have the guts to tell them like, look, you're being difficult, you know, this is what's going to blow the deal. Because even though it is a seller's market buyers right now also extremely frustrated, and the emotional like component that its toll that it's taking on them, a lot of them are saying eff it, and they walk away, and they blow up the deal because the seller pushed too hard. And even with the market being as nuts as it is, the minute you have a back on market status, buyers say what's wrong with it, and now lost that ability to sell for as high as you could have sold for and you lose the ability to try and get the same traction in the same terms, you know, like waived inspections that you could have gotten had you just been that a little bit more reasonable and a little bit more empathetic to the buyer.

Rory Gill:

And so we talked about educating the buyer, because it's critically important, but I think you know, that's key right there educating the seller, that period of time from when you secure the listing, take the photos, prepare the marketing, announce the you know, put the listing now it's the open house, that has to be so well orchestrated, because the buyers understanding is such that if something's on the market for more than 10 days, there was something wrong with it, you know, you have no ability to course correct in this market if you're on the seller side. I still think most standard properties will be able to sell, you lose that excitement that is really causing those bidding wars and allowing the sellers to get what they want,

Ryan Glass:

Then you lose leverage, you're giving buyers more power in terms of negotiations, whereas they really don't have much power your first weekend on the market.

Rory Gill:

Earlier, you mentioned something about, you know, the opportunities for off market properties. And kind of an interesting fiduciary ethical question I always have is when does it make sense for a seller to sell their property off market? What are your thoughts on that?

Ryan Glass:

Sure. So I am extremely transparent with my clients, I tell every single seller, it is always in your best interest to go to public market, you never know how high you could have sold for unless you went to public market and open it up to every single audience. But you sometimes just have situations where maybe the seller just had a baby and with COVID times they don't want people coming in and out of their house and they want to get your sale. I get that one a lot people who just had kids and they have the kids just have so much crap, let's be real. So they're thinking how are we gonna, you know, get the house show ready, get rid of all the you know, toys and the like the bouncy things and you know, all those things that little infants and toddlers need, especially in the city in the small spaces that make it really hard. So that one's a big one where, you know, a lot of times they're not necessarily wanting to go to public market, they take convenience, as long as it's a good number. I get that a lot. A lot of times I test out a higher number off market you know sometimes, you know sellers just like I said they're getting greedy so sometimes we try the off market route to see what the feedback we're getting. especially when it's a number that I just know is, you know, a little ridiculous. But sometimes they get it because of the off market alert, you can position the property in that way as well, you know, we're just going to go to market, you're not going to give us that number, you do get a buyer who comes in and falls in love with it. And sometimes it's very personal situations, you know, death, divorce, where people again, they're choosing convenience over value, you know, sometimes, you know, you would think that a sellers motivation will always be top dollar. But that isn't always the case, sometimes they just want a clean, easy sale, I mean, they're not going to give away the property. But if they get a number that they're happy with, you know, and even if you're saying to them, well, you can maybe get 10 to 15 more, if we went to public market, they might not choose that they might choose the convenience.

Rory Gill:

Actually, if it's all right with you, I might still one of your ideas there. And that is to do the test market the test off market at a higher rate that might help with the I see it helping with some sellers who have an unreasonable expectation, then you can get to work there and off market without, you know, ending up with a large number of days on market and actually hurting anyone mentioned that you have in selling the property.

Ryan Glass:

And sometimes it's just a tricky one to comp out. I mean, if you have them, it's just very, very unique and not cookie cutter at all, that always makes pulling comps way harder. Sometimes you as the agent are saying what's try off market to see if we can push the value, you know, especially the upper like luxury market, you know, you might want to be tempted do another 50-100,000 more. But that could be the kiss of death if you're wrong going on public markets. So you know, a lot of times just getting agents in there hearing their feedback, seeing the response, seeing if you even get phone calls, putting it up on TAN - Top Agent Network, all of that gives you really great, great, great insight, which helps you price it better if you plan on going to Public Market eventually anyhow.

Rory Gill:

And then with the luxury market within Boston, there's some opportunities and some challenges in there, you know, what's your sense of what's going on in the the upper tier of the market here?

Ryan Glass:

So it's really unique, I mean, the city itself, since COVID, pockets are moving and pockets are sitting. Prime locations aren't really sitting on the market at all, you know, if you're in a great, great, great, great location, that's still selling really, really fast. But you know, luxury buyers are extremely fickle with certain things are sitting. And since COVID, you know, especially because people just spend so much more time at home, and people aren't really going to offices still, you know, people aren't making the compromises that they would have made three years ago. And I think that has been huge. And that has actually been a huge thing to a seller, as agents for sellers that we really have to advise them on, you know, making them understand, you know, the products have changed, you know, what people are willing to pay for certain products has drastically changed. You know, for example, one bedrooms have been hit huge through COVID, you know, couples won't do a one bedroom anymore, where they would have just to be in their prime location, you know, so things like that, you know, small little things, you know, people have definitely gotten much, much more pickier on and you can overcome it, but you have to overcome it through pricing, you have to price it right. And you have to make sure the seller understands why you're missing the mark, if you go too high.

Rory Gill:

I mean, I think that's where we have a more interesting conversation than just saying that this is, you know, across the board a seller's market or an intense market, because we do see some kind of interesting shifts in buyer preference within this market within the state. You know, I remember doing having the modest single family homes in the suburbs in the summer of 2020. And everybody in the world wanted to go looking and putting offers in on that particular property class. And we've kind of bounced back and shifted, but the preference is back in 2019, you know, down the street from we are in the Seaport. A lot of those developments have not necessarily stalled out or done poorly. That's probably not the right way to describe it. But their preeminence in the market has now taken a few steps backwards.

Ryan Glass:

Well, just the trends have changed too. I mean, the first time buyer market, for example, is doing extremely well. You know, so many millennials, you know, moved home to their parents house, you know, let their leases expire and just banked a ton of cash. And a lot of them are you know, now looking to get into the market for the first time. And actually one trend I've noticed a ton this year, which has been interesting to me is yes, a lot of people have left the city and gone to the suburbs, but a ton of people who were living out of state, especially millennials who were like beginning their careers or move somewhere for a job. They all left whatever state they were in came home and now have decided to stay in Boston. So while you have these people who have left the city for the burbs, you have all these people who have returned to Massachusetts from random locations, and have decided to stay and want to be in the city. And because they've big down payments, you know, that market, I've noticed it's just doing extremely well. I've noticed the buyers in that market are much more qualified than usual, you know, you're not looking at, you know, 10 to 15% down payments, you're looking at 20 to 30% down. So it's just been an interesting shift, even in that market, that I've noticed, especially this year.

Rory Gill:

And you know, I've also the places that people are choosing within the state, I mean, the I think the communities that are a little bit outside of Boston, but still retain some urban amenities are the ones that are set up for success in the coming years.

Ryan Glass:

Oh, Quincy is on fire. Like I used to a house in Quincy. And I bought it when I was 26 because it was a cheap place to buy that was close to the city. And now it's like untouchable. I mean, that little two bedroom bungalow that I bought the 305 would probably sell for like 500,000 today, which is insane for a two bedroom house.

Rory Gill:

You're just ahead of your time with with that choice right there.

Ryan Glass:

Yeah

Rory Gill:

You know, and we're talking about kind of COVID era and what it's done to the market. But I also think it's fascinating what it's done to our business. In our office, we've, we did a couple things under necessity when COVID first struck, that have stuck around some ways that we conduct our open houses, some ways that we have our meetings. Has anything changed in your business over the past couple of years that you're going to keep?

Ryan Glass:

So the thing that - it's a double edged sword, I love it and hate it at the same time. Nobody wants to just get a cup of coffee anymore to discuss their search or discuss their listing. It's all Zoom you know, like, I think COVID has made us so lazy. And some days I love the efficiency, I mean, I'll be honest, I'm saving a ton of money not schmoozing clients taking them to drinks, you know. So that has made me laugh. But I do miss the social component of the job. Like I do feel like I use so much more time in person with my clients. And now I really don't get to know them until we're out seeing properties. But I do miss the part of the job of, you know, getting drinks, going over data in person having a fun social night out while also discussing business, that part of the job has really gone away for me. And it's funny that I it's like pulling teeth to try and get a client to meet for coffee that they don't want to do it. They've got to be like, Hey, can we zoom Tuesday at 530? You know, they don't want to go anywhere.

Rory Gill:

I mean, it's such a challenge, because this is such a relationship business, people that work with us, not because you know, not because they you know, even have a great website, they're not working with us, because of the great website, they're working, because something about us, they know like and trust. And if it's just a challenge, if that's a core business to, you know, to instill that to create that relationship, if you don't get to meet with them in person, you know, meeting on Zoom is wonderful. It's better than a phone call, but it does no replacement for meeting somebody in person.

Ryan Glass:

Really great.

Rory Gill:

You know, this probably is kind of wanted to wrap things up and shift into some of our closing questions that we ask of everybody that sits down and, you know, takes the time to meet with us. And first off, I just want to ask you, if you if you had to give a presentation for 20 or 30 minutes on any topic with no preparation, what would you be able to present?

Ryan Glass:

Oh, I could talk to a wall. So that would be easy. I love coaching and mentoring completely brand new rookie agents who just passed the real estate exam and have absolutely no idea where to begin. I've been doing this since I was 19. And that was a really hard age to start because none of my friends were buying. You know, I wasn't at that age where people could afford to buy and who's gonna trust a 19 year old to sell their home. You know, I'm a hustler. And I that's what I love about the job is you get what you put into it. And yeah, no, hands down. I could spend easily a half hour just giving tons and tons of tips and advice of how to get going, how to create momentum and how to start building your book of business.

Rory Gill:

The next thing I wanted to ask is if you what happened early on in your career or your life that changes the way that you work now.

Ryan Glass:

So I started part time in 2009. And so as good as this wild ride has been the past you know, however long the market has just been insane and hit this it has just come back from the recession. I remember how hard it was. I remember having you know, my first listing and it took me six months to sell and doing an open house every single weekend until I finally got the job done. And so it's definitely made me extremely conservative financially. You know, I just like I said, I like one thing that kept me from going full time for so long was just the fear of being 100% commission. And you know, a lot of that stemmed from starting off in 2009 You know, I see some of my my friends and I love them but to be honest that kind of dumb with their money. And I know, it's because they've only known it on the upswing. You know, they're buying extremely expensive cars or buying extremely expensive places. And, you know, even though I'm extremely secure and confident in my business, and I really think I can survive anything at this point, in the back of my head, I just like a lot of money in the bank. I just always been thinking, you know, the market could tank tomorrow. And I think a lot of us had that rude awakening during the shutdown, you know, especially in the city, you know, it was hard to get buyers to go out and buy and my buyers who did buy bought killer deals 70 80,000 under ask, which, when have you ever seen that in the city? And even with that opportunity, people were not buying and that was very, very frightening. And you know, there's three months I just didn't work, you know, I was trying like crazy to, but it was very real. I'm not gonna lie, it was very frightening, going three months without a paycheck and thinking, when is this going to get better? Especially something like COVID, which we had, there was no precedent for, you know, it wasn't like the recession, where people were like, oh, yeah, after a year, it really started to pick up again, it was there was no, we didn't know that could have gone on for a year for all we knew. And I think agents who are new should always remember that.

Rory Gill:

I don't mind saying that everything we had in our pipeline came out. It eventually came back. But we had a few months of just zero income. And yeah, nothing really replacing it. And two years later, we can look back at perfect hindsight, and say there's nothing to worry about. But that was a that was supposed to be our spring market also, oh, that was our that was our high end high season. And it was, it was gone.

Ryan Glass:

I make 80% of my income by June. So no being in that March to June 1 shut down. I was like, how am I? How am I gonna make any money this year, this is when I make most of my money. And it was just, you know, it was scary times.

Rory Gill:

And I mean, when you talk to your agents and train your mentor your new agents, do you try to bring back those memories and, you know, make them aware of it. It's one thing to start in a slow market in 2009. But I'm afraid what's going to happen to certain, you know, uncoached agents who are coming in, during the height during the peak.

Ryan Glass:

Absolutely. 1,000 percent. Just kind of constantly reminding them that is that's the other thing too is the market changes like that. It changes it, you know, the way you don't see it coming back the exact same way you don't see it crashing, you know, it just overnight, it can change on you. And, you know, again, so even before 2009, I was working at a real estate firm answering phones. So I think I started that in 2006. So I saw the tail end of the previous boom. And it was very interesting listening to the conversations in the office and hearing them talk about how much hotter it's getting, or how much inventory this suddenly is. And I experienced it a little bit in 2009. But I was only part time but you know, again, living through COVID It was very, like a fresh reminder, you know, something I never quite forgot. But then actually experiencing it as a full time agent was completely different of an experience.

Rory Gill:

And then finally, what's something that you're listening to watching or reading these days.

Ryan Glass:

So right now, I'm a little late on the bandwagon, but I'm binge watching all five seasons of Friday Night Lights, and I just find it so motivational. I love it. It's funny, because I don't even like sports. But for some reason I love sport TV shows or sport movies, because they're just so inspirational. And it just, you know, I'm always playing mental mind games myself to keep my head in the game, you know, real estate's a hustle, it's a grind. Some days, it's a burnout and you don't want to do the things that make you successful. Because it takes so long for it to develop, you know, for those seeds, the you know, finally grow. And yeah, so anything like that, that like inspires me. And that one is my latest right now is Friday Night Lights.

Rory Gill:

Great. All right. Thanks, Ryan. Where can our listeners find out more about you or get in touch with you?

Ryan Glass:

ryanjglass.com.

Rory Gill:

Right. And I would direct everybody there too if they want to take a look at the Ryan Explains It All series. It's great. You get some good information about the market. And you get to know Ryan a little bit too. Thanks, Ryan and for everybody, just a reminder, my name is Rory Gill. I'm at Nexthome Titletown. Nexthometitletown.com or UrbanVillage Legal, urbanvillagelegal.com. Thank you so much, Ryan. Thank you for the good information. It was nice having some good local talk about Boston. I look forward to the next time. Thanks, Ryan!

Ryan Glass:

Thanks for having me on.

Announcer:

This has been The Real Estate Law Podcast. Because real estate is more than just pretty pictures. And law goes well beyond the paperwork and courtroom arguments. were powered by NextHome Titletown greater Boston's progressive real estate brokerage. More at nexthometitletown.com and UrbanVillage Legal, Massachusetts real estate counseling serving savvy property owners, lenders and investors more at urbanvillagelegal.com. Today's conversation was not legal advice, but we hope you found it entertaining and informative. Discover more at realestatelawpodcast.com Thank you for listening!